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E-Cigarettes’ Effect Lingers

State, Local Laws Silent On Electronic Devices

Posted: January 5, 2014 at 5 a.m.

Jesse McCoy, of Bentonville, smoke an electronic cigarette Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 during a concert at George's Majestic Lounge in Fayetteville. Electronic cigarettes have risen in popularity recently, but where they fall on health concerns and public smoking ordinances is confusing to some.

The country’s leading electronic cigarette maker advertises its products as giving people the “freedom to smoke anywhere.”

At A Glance

State, Local Law

According to the Arkansas Clean Indoor Air Act of 2006, smoking is prohibited in all public places and enclosed areas within most workplaces. Private residences, designated hotel and motel rooms, workplaces with fewer than three employees, retail tobacco stores and restaurants and bars that require patrons to be at least 21 to enter are excluded.

Fayetteville’s smoking ordinance, which went into effect in 2004, defines smoking as “holding a lighted pipe, cigar or cigarette of any kind or lighting or emitting or exhaling the smoke of a pipe, cigar or cigarette of any kind.” Smoking is prohibited in all public places, workplaces and city vehicles in Fayetteville, except for bars and retail tobacco stores.

Source: Staff Report


At A Glance

Tax Laws

• E-cigarettes aren’t subject to the same tax laws as tobacco products.

• Traditional cigarettes are taxed at $1.15 per pack.

• Other tobacco products are taxed at 68 percent of their invoice price.

• E-cigarettes are only subject to state and local sales taxes.

Source: Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration


Web Watch

Need Help Quitting?

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration encourages smokers to call 1-800-QUITNOW (1-800-784-8669) to talk to a smoking cessation counselor or go to smokefree.gov for online resources to help quit.

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