(Advertisement)

NSA put off plans after leaks

Even good ideas now seen as toxic

Posted: February 3, 2014 at 3:29 a.m.

National Security Agency Director Gen. Keith Alexander greets audience members before President Barack Obama spoke about National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance, Friday, Jan. 17, 2014, at the Justice Department in Washington. Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, President Barack Obama on Friday called for ending the government's control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing such records. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

WASHINGTON — Early last year, as Edward Snowden was secretly purloining classified documents from National Security Agency computers in Hawaii, the agency’s director, Gen. Keith Alexander, was gearing up to sell Congress and the public on a proposal for the National Security Agency to defend private U.S. computer networks against cyberattacks.

This story is only available from our archives.

Front Section, Pages 1 on 02/03/2014

(Advertisement)



« Previous Story

Boycott warning dismissed by Israeli

A Palestinian activist argues with Israeli army soldiers after building a tent in Jordan valley near the West Bank town of Tubas, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014. Dozens of local and foreign activists have built a tent site northern Jordan valley over night called the Return village to symbolize the Palestinian refugees right for return and the Palestinians rights in the Jordan Valley. Israel demanded in US brokered peace talk a long security presence in the Jordan valley, the issue rejected by pedestrians who say its a major part of their occupied land and Israel must leave it in any peace deal. (AP Photo/Mohammed Ballas)

JERUSALEM — Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Sunday dismissed warnings by U.S. Secretary of State ... Read »

Next Story »

State: Flood data need update

The failure to anticipate major flooding in Arkansas over the past five years is due, in part, to out-of-date information that experts say will take two years and $300,000 ... Read »