(Advertisement)

Not its hog farm, says Cargill

Posted: April 20, 2013 at 4:24 a.m.

There’s some confusion over over just how many hogs the controversial industrial farm near Mount Judea in the Buffalo National River watershed will house in a confined space, and the expected results of that ill-advised enterprise.

This story is only available from our archives.

Editorial, Pages 19 on 04/20/2013

(Advertisement)



« Previous Story

LETTERS

Education for good of all For many years, societies have searched for panaceas (i.e. cure-alls ). Where education is concerned, the current panacea is claimed by some to be... Read »

Next Story »

Held hostage by rural America

Debate on gun legislation began this week in the Senate. Gun manufacturers, the National Rifle Association, a narrow band of gun-rights ideologues and, to a lesser degree, ... Read »

Hey all you oh so compassionate progressives, guess who is leading the charge to save the Buffalo National River? It's your arch enemy, Mike Masterson. What are you doing to help? Write a letter, call the Governors office, call ADEQ, Write your congressional representative. Thanks Mike, for having the courage to keep calling these sacks out, may not always agree with you, but good job!!!!!!

Posted by: Osage

April 20, 2013 at 9:15 a.m. ( | suggest removal )

Mike Masterson is back to supporting worthwhile causes since his divorce.

Mike grew up in Buffalo River Country, reported on the Scenic River act getting into action while his Congressman from Harrison, John Paul Hammerschmidt(R), played a key role in getting the National Scenic River designation for the Buffalo to protect it from contamination such as these hog farms.

Masterson will be well-remembered for his actions on this.

Posted by: cdawg

April 20, 2013 at 7:12 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

Has anyone gone to the ADEQ web site and actually read the permit? I admit I haven't because I really don't care much about the issue and naturally have complete and unwavering trust in my government (not). I have filed similar permits for construction and other things like CAFO"s (Confined Animal Feeding Operations) with ADEQ over the years so I have some expreriience with it.

None were easy and ADEQ was strict. Some of it like measuring and estimating the CO2 output (US EPA requirement) of animal respiration are downright goofy! Regardless, we must trust in government like "In God We Trust" on our money.

It is easy to disagree on matters of government policy, rules, and regulations, but if anyone thinks that because Cargill is a large comapny they have any kind of "pull" or get any special consideration forget it. That simply is not the case.

In defense of ADEQ I must report from personal experience that they don't give a hoot who you are. Either you comply or don't. If you don't they don't have the slightest problem with taking you to task for it. On the other hand if you do "legally" comply they don't have a lot of ability to stop you, even if it doesn't sound right to the puclic or anyone else.

It's all about government environmental rules, regulations, and law. Those are not flexible things. They are technically very precise and opinion doesn't enter into it excpet at the rule making stage. Once done, those rules are cast in concrete and unchangeable. What is interesting is that like anything government does, it is like a double edged dagger that is sharp on both sides. Both sides can cut you and cause harm.

Reading these back and forths are entertaining and simply hillarious stuff!

Posted by: jeffieboy

April 20, 2013 at 8:56 p.m. ( | suggest removal )