New Standards Challenge Teachers, Engage Students

Common Core used in kindergarten through second grades

Posted: October 2, 2011 at 5:55 a.m.

Jordan Herzberg, Root Elementary School first-grader, raises her hand to ask a question Thursday as assistant teacher Cory White talks about herbivores, carnivores and omnivores during a science lesson in Fayetteville.
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Jordan Herzberg, Root Elementary School first-grader, raises her hand to ask a question Thursday as assistant teacher Cory White talks about herbivores, carnivores and omnivores during a science lesson in Fayetteville.

The new Common Core education standards take students way beyond Dick and Jane, the children who lived on Pleasant Street with their baby sister, Sally, and their dog, Spot, and helped children learn to read in the 1940s or 1950s, even into the 1960s.

At A Glance

What Is Common Core?

The Common Core State Standards Initiative, coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best Practices and the Council of Chief State School Officers, attempts to provide a clear and consistent framework to prepare all children for college and the workforce. The standards define the knowledge and skills students should have within their K-12 education careers so that they will graduate high school able to succeed in entry-level, credit-bearing academic college courses and in workforce training programs.

Source: Staff Report

Tina Blythe, Shaw Elementary School fifth-grade teacher, talks about a chart she and other Springdale teachers created to help use the national Common...

Another Glance

Developing Assessments

The Partnership for the Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers is an alliance of 24 states, including Arkansas, working together, to develop common assessments for Common Core states. Those states have an estimated 25 million students. The partnership’s work is paid for through a four-year, $185 million dollar grant from the U.S. Department of Education. Some 200 higher education institutions and systems will help develop the high school component of the new assessment, then use it as an indicator of student readiness for college work. The partnership’s goal is to make sure all students graduate from high school college- and career-ready.

Source: Staff Report

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