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Arkansas coach Dave Van Horn speaks to pitching coach Matt Hobbs during the seventh inning of a Feb. 16, 2019, game against Eastern Illinois at Baum-Walker Stadium in Fayetteville. - Photo by Andy Shupe of NWA Democrat-Gazette

Published on May 16, 2021

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Kris Williams, director of energy services for Ozarks Electric Cooperative Corp. demonstrates how one of the cooperative‰Ûªs Tesla Model 3 electric vehicles is charged Wednesday, May 12, 2021, at the cooperative‰Ûªs offices in Fayetteville. It can be challenging to find charging stations for electric vehicles in rural areas of Arkansas, but both the state and private companies are working to change that. Visit nwaonline.com/210518Daily/ for today's photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Andy Shupe)

Published on May 16, 2021

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Kris Williams, director of energy services for Ozarks Electric Cooperative Corp. demonstrates the navigation system of the cooperativeÍs Tesla Model 3 electric vehicles assists in planning a route to a destination with consideration of where charging stations are located Wednesday, May 12, 2021, at the cooperativeÍs offices in Fayetteville. It can be challenging to find charging stations for electric vehicles in rural areas of Arkansas, but both the state and private companies are working to change that. Visit nwaonline.com/210518Daily/ for today's photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Andy Shupe)

Published on May 16, 2021

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Kris Williams, director of energy services for Ozarks Electric Cooperative Corp. shows a graph of the energy usage of one of the cooperativeÍs Tesla Model 3 electric vehicles Wednesday, May 12, 2021, at the cooperativeÍs offices in Fayetteville. It can be challenging to find charging stations for electric vehicles in rural areas of Arkansas, but both the state and private companies are working to change that. Visit nwaonline.com/210518Daily/ for today's photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Andy Shupe)

Published on May 16, 2021

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Kris Williams, director of energy services for Ozarks Electric Cooperative Corp. demonstrates how one of the cooperative‰Ûªs Tesla Model 3 electric vehicles is charged Wednesday, May 12, 2021, at the cooperative‰Ûªs offices in Fayetteville. It can be challenging to find charging stations for electric vehicles in rural areas of Arkansas, but both the state and private companies are working to change that. Visit nwaonline.com/210518Daily/ for today's photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Andy Shupe)

Published on May 16, 2021

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Kris Williams, director of energy services for Ozarks Electric Cooperative Corp. demonstrates how one of the cooperativeÍs Tesla Model 3 electric vehicles is charged Wednesday, May 12, 2021, at the cooperativeÍs offices in Fayetteville. It can be challenging to find charging stations for electric vehicles in rural areas of Arkansas, but both the state and private companies are working to change that. Visit nwaonline.com/210518Daily/ for today's photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Andy Shupe)

Published on May 16, 2021

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Liu Yifei, star of the live-action “Mulan,” poses for photographers at the premiere of the film at the El Capitan Theatre on March 9, 2020, in Los Angeles. (AP/Chris Pizzello)

Published on May 16, 2021

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Published on May 16, 2021

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Writer and pulp magazine collector Michael Tierney has helped rescue “The Cosmic Courtship,” a long-lost sci-fi adventure tale from 1917 by Julian Hawthorne, and has joined with Little Rock’s Cirsova Publishing to re-publish the story. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette/Cary Jenkins)

Published on May 16, 2021

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Artist Fred W. Small’s original cover art from All-Story Weekly appears on the new paperback version of “The Cosmic Courtship.” (Special to the Democrat-Gazette/Cirsova Publishing)

Published on May 16, 2021

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The original 1917 issues of All-Story Weekly featuring the first appearance of Julian Hawthorne’s “The Cosmic Courtship.” (Special to the Democrat-Gazette/Michael Tierney)

Published on May 16, 2021

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A silver English shilling found during a dig in St. Mary’s, Md., is more proof that archaeologists have pinpointed the correct location of an old fort. (Courtesy of Historic St. Mary’s City)

Published on May 16, 2021

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Archaeologist Travis Parno points out potential features of the original fort at St. Mary’s. (The Washington Post/Bill O’Leary)

Published on May 16, 2021

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This 1964 aerial view of downtown Little Rock Aerial shows the Manning Hotel, located between the Marion Hotel and Faubus hotels. Formerly the Ben McGehee Hotel, the Manning was bought and renamed by hotelier Grady Manning, who had earlier served as assistant manager of the Marion. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette file photo)

Published on May 16, 2021

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A sign welcoming students and staff of Morrison Elementary School can be seen at the front of Grand Avenue Baptist Church in Fort Smith on Thursday. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Thomas Saccente)

Published on May 16, 2021

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The Fort Smith Symphony played the first concert of its 2020-21 season outdoors at the U.S. Marshals Museum. Music director John Jeter says there will be one outdoor performance among the five subscription concerts for the 2021-22 season. (Courtesy Photo/Fort Smith Symphony)

Published on May 16, 2021

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This July 2019, photo release by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, shows a distended belly on this juvenile Chinook salmon is a clinical sign of Ceratomyxa shasta infection. A severe drought is creating a water crisis not seen in more than a century for farmers, tribes and federally protected fish along the Oregon-California border. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation says it won't release water into the main canal that feeds the massive Klamath Project irrigation system for the first time in 114 years, leaving many farmers and ranchers with no water at all. The agency also says it won't release water from the same dam to increase downstream water levels in the lower Klamath River, where tribes say 97% of juvenile salmon are dying from a bacterial disease caused by poor water conditions. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)

Published on May 16, 2021

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This handout photo released by the Yurok Tribe shows 70 dead juvenile salmon captured by the Yurok Tribe that are presumed to have died from deadly pathogen, Ceratonova shasta, in the Klamath River water flows. On May 4, 2021, the most recent date for which data is available, 97% of the juvenile salmon captured between the Shasta River and Scott River stretch of the Klamath were infected with C. Shasta and will be dead within days, according to the Yurok Tribe. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation says it won't release water into the main canal that feeds the massive Klamath Project irrigation system for the first time in 114 years, leaving many farmers and ranchers with no water at all. The agency also says it won't release water from the same dam to increase downstream water levels in the lower Klamath River, where tribes say 97% of juvenile salmon are dying from a bacterial disease caused by poor water conditions. ( Jamie Holt/Yurok Tribe via AP)

Published on May 16, 2021

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FILE - In this April 8, 2015, file photo, a tractor works a parcel of farm land in the Klamath Basin near Klamath Falls, Ore. A severe drought is creating a water crisis not seen in more than a century for farmers, tribes and federally protected fish along the Oregon-California border. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation says it won't release water into the main canal that feeds the massive Klamath Project irrigation system for the first time in 114 years, leaving many farmers and ranchers with no water at all. (Dave Martinez/The Herald And News via AP, File)

Published on May 16, 2021

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A group of roughly 30 people affiliated with People's Rights Oregon gathered at Klamath Irrigation District headquarters in Klamath Falls, Ore., on Thursday, May 13, 2021, to protest after federal regulators shut off irrigation water to farmers from a critical reservoir due to drought conditions. (Alex Schwartz/The Herald And News via AP)

Published on May 16, 2021

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