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Marta Chicui, Floarea Miclescu, Claudia Velcu, Narcisa Velcu, Voinea Gratiani Miclescu and Francisca Velcu

Published on May 4, 2021

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Marta Chicui, Floarea Miclescu, Claudia Velcu, Narcisa Velcu, Voinea Gratiani Miclescu and Francisca Velcu

Published on May 4, 2021

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Vivek Govind Kumar (left) and Joe Neal look at birds in March 2021 at the state fish hatchery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Flip Putthoff)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A meadowlark explores a hatchery meadow. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Flip Putthoff)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Rusty blackbirds rest near a hatchery pond in mid March 2021. Rusty blackbirds nest in the boreal forests of northern Canada and migrate to Arkansas and the Southeast during winter. They have likely flown north by now. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Flip Putthoff)

Published on May 4, 2021

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The hatchery's 17 ponds attract an array of birds. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Flip Putthoff)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A display at a viewing pavilion helps people identify some of the birds they may see at the hatchery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Flip Putthoff)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Terry Stanfill (left) and Vivek Govind Kumar watch for birds in March 2021 at the Charlie Craig State Fish Hatchery in Centerton. The Arkansas Game and Fish Commission raises walleye, catfish at other species at the hatchery. It's 17 ponds and surrounding habitat attract a variety of birds.

Published on May 4, 2021

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Storm damange at Fairview Cemetery Tuesday May 4, 2021, off Fayetteville Road in Van Buren. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/DAVID GOTTSCHALK)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Storm damange at Fairview Cemetery Tuesday May 4, 2021, off Fayetteville Road in Van Buren. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/DAVID GOTTSCHALK)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE -- The east entrance to Arsaga's at The Depot is visible December 11, 2019, off of West Avenue in Fayetteville. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/DAVID GOTTSCHALK)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Storm damage around the historic Crawford County Courthouse Tuesday, May 4, 2021 in downtown Van Buren. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/DAVID GOTTSCHALK)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Storm damage around the historic Crawford County Courthouse Tuesday, May 4, 2021 in downtown Van Buren. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/DAVID GOTTSCHALK)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Storm damage around the historic Crawford County Courthouse Tuesday, May 4, 2021 in downtown Van Buren. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/DAVID GOTTSCHALK)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Storm damage around the historic Crawford County Courthouse Tuesday, May 4, 2021 in downtown Van Buren. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/DAVID GOTTSCHALK)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE -- Donna Marshall (center) and her mom, Frances Andrews, get their shots of the Pfizer covid-19 vaccine on Wednesday March 31 2021 from Matt Taylor during the first of 13 vaccination clinics to be held each week at the Benton County Fairground auditorium, 7640 SW Regional Airport Blvd. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Flip Putthoff)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Gov. Asa Hutchinson speaks Tuesday April 27, 2021 at the state Capitol during his weekly covid-19 update. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette/Staton Breidenthal)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Workers at a mostly empty covid-19 vaccination clinic located at Cathedral of the Cross A.O.H. Church of God in Birmingham, Ala., are shown on Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP/Jay Reeves)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Relatives bury the body of a covid-19 victim at a graveyard in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, May 4, 2021. (AP/Ishant Chauhan)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Derrick Pounds and his daughter, Madison, 6, clean up debris around their residence on Elvis Presley Drive in Tupelo, Miss., Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP/Thomas Graning)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE -- Former state Sen. Jon Woods walks Friday, April 27, 2018, outside the John Paul Hammerschmidt Federal Building in Fayetteville. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE)

Published on May 4, 2021

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SUBMITTED The Creek Rocks features Cindy Woolf, who was raised in Batesville, along the southern foothills of the Ozarks Mountain region, and Mark Bilyeu, who hails from Springfield, Mo., located atop the Ozarks Plateau. They began their musical collaboration in 2003 with Mark at the helm for Woolf’s debut CD “Simple and Few.” They married each other in 2013, shortly after the release of Cindy’s third solo CD, “May.”

Published on May 4, 2021

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Brad Karren

Published on May 4, 2021

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Amy Lee of Evanescence performs as the band kicks off its tour in support of the album “Synthesis” at The Pearl concert theater at Palms Casino Resort in a 2017 file photo. With a revamped lineup and a new album recorded with caution during the pandemic, Evanescence is sharing “The Bitter Truth.” (TNS/Getty Images/Ethan Miller)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Evanescence arrives at the 2012 Revolver Golden Gods Award Show at Club Nokia in Los Angeles. This year Evanescence will release “The Bitter Truth,” its first album of new material since 2011. (Getty Images/TNS/Frazer Harrison)

Published on May 4, 2021

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The Jacob Wolf House, built in 1829, is now a state historic site. (Special to the Democrat-Gazette/Marcia Schnedler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Entry to the Jacob Wolf House is via an outside stairway in the back. (Special to the Democrat-Gazette/Marcia Schnedler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Jurors did their deliberations on the Jacob Wolf House’s ground floor. (Special to the Democrat-Gazette/Marcia Schnedler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A sign outside the Jacob Wolf House gives a brief history of the site. (Special to the Democrat-Gazette/Marcia Schnedler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Are these really footprints left by Bigfoot? The story is told in the Hulu series “Sasquatch.” (Hulu)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Should Tesla and SpaceX honcho Elon Musk host “Saturday Night Live”? People have strong feelings about that. (AP file photo)

Published on May 4, 2021

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West Memphis, circa 1955: The New Plaza Office of the Bank of West Memphis showcased a prime example of midcentury modern architecture, and in the card of the architect’s rendering it promoted its two drive-thru windows.

Published on May 4, 2021

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President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden wave after stepping off Marine One on the Ellipse near the White House, Monday, May 3, 2021, in Washington. The Biden's traveled Monday to coastal Virginia to promote his plans to increase spending on education and children, part of his $1.8 trillion families proposal announced last week. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Visitors enjoy their day on Tiananmen Square during the May Day holidays in Beijing on Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Published on May 4, 2021

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People ride an escalator along the Las Vegas Strip, Saturday, April 24, 2021, in Las Vegas. Las Vegas is bustling again after casino capacity limits were raised Saturday, May 1, to 80% and person-to-person distancing dropped to 3 feet (0.9 meters). (AP Photo/John Locher)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this April 30, 2021, file photo, a family member performs the last rites of a COVID-19 victim at a crematorium in Jammu, in Jammu, India. Pandemic-weary travelers are returning to the skies and casinos in the United States and eating out again in Greece as the vaccine rollout is sending news cases and deaths tumbling in more affluent countries, contrasting with a worsening disaster in India. (AP Photo/Channi Anand, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Relatives of a person who died of COVID-19 mourn outside a field hospital in Mumbai, India, Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)

Published on May 4, 2021

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People sit in on a cafe terrace, in the Monastiraki district of Athens, with the ancient Acropolis hill in the background, Monday, May 3, 2021. Cafes and restaurants have reopened in Greece for sit-down service for the first time in nearly six months, as the country began easing coronavirus-related restrictions with a view to opening to the vital tourism industry in the summer. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

Published on May 4, 2021

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People walk along the Las Vegas Strip, Saturday, April 24, 2021, in Las Vegas. Las Vegas is bustling again after casino capacity limits were raised Saturday, May 1, to 80% and person-to-person distancing dropped to 3 feet (0.9 meters). (AP Photo/John Locher)

Published on May 4, 2021

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People stream into Maximo Gomez Park, also known as Domino Park, after it reopened after it was closed last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Monday, May 3, 2021, in the Little Havana neighborhood of Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this May 2, 2021, file photo, Austin Kennedy, left, a Seattle Sounders season ticket holder, gets the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic in a concourse at Lumen Field prior to an MLS soccer match between the Sounders and the Los Angeles Galaxy. Air travel in the U.S. hit its highest mark since COVID-19 took hold more than 13 months ago, while European Union officials are proposing to ease restrictions on visitors to the continent as the vaccine rollout sends new cases and deaths tumbling in more affluent countries. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Students arrive at school in Le Chesnay, west of Paris, Modnay, May 3, 2021. In France, high schools reopened and a ban on domestic travel was lifted. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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People ride an escalator along the Las Vegas Strip, Saturday, April 24, 2021, in Las Vegas. Las Vegas is bustling again after casino capacity limits were raised Saturday, May 1, to 80% and person-to-person distancing dropped to 3 feet (0.9 meters). (AP Photo/John Locher)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this March 20, 2021, file photo, passengers on a Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 flight line up to exit the aircraft after arriving at Houston's Hobby airport. Air travel in the U.S. hit its highest mark since COVID-19 took hold more than 13 months ago, while European Union officials are proposing to ease restrictions on visitors to the continent as the vaccine rollout sends new cases and deaths tumbling in more affluent countries. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this file photo dated Wednesday, April 14, 2021, a pharmacist fills a syringe from a vial of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine in Antwerp, Belgium. Moderna and vaccine promoter Gavi have announced Monday May 3, 2021, the pharmaceutical company will provide up to 500 million coronavirus vaccine doses for the U.N.-backed program for needy people in low- and middle-income countries by the end of 2022. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, FILE)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Vickie Savell looks at the remains of her new mobile home early Monday, May 3, 2021, in Yazoo County, Miss. Multiple tornadoes were reported across Mississippi on Sunday, causing some damage but no immediate word of injuries. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Vickie Savell gestures whole looking at the remains of her new mobile home early Monday, May 3, 2021, in Yazoo County, Miss. Multiple tornadoes were reported across Mississippi on Sunday, causing some damage but no immediate word of injuries. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Alfred Lee covers a damaged spot on the roof of his home on Elvis Presley Drive in Tupelo, Miss., Monday, May 3, 2021. Multiple tornadoes were reported across Mississippi on Sunday, causing some damage but no immediate word of injuries.(AP Photo/Thomas Graning)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Downed trees cover Oakview Drive in Tupelo, Miss., Monday, May 3, 2021. A line of severe storms rolled through the state Sunday afternoon and into the nighttime hours. Late Sunday, a “tornado emergency” was declared for Tupelo and surrounding areas. (AP Photo/Thomas Graning)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A downed tree and damaged homes are seen along Elvis Presley Drive in Tupelo, Miss., Monday, May 3, 2021. Multiple tornadoes were reported across Mississippi on Sunday, causing some damage but no immediate word of injuries. (AP Photo/Thomas Graning)

Published on May 4, 2021

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The remains of a mobile home are shown early Monday, May 3, 2021, in Yazoo County, Miss. Multiple tornadoes were reported across Mississippi on Sunday, causing some damage but no immediate word of injuries. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Neighbors Alfred Lee and Grace Bazzy hug in front of another neighbor's damaged home along Elvis Presley Drive in Tupelo, Miss., Monday, May 3, 2021. Multiple tornadoes were reported across Mississippi on Sunday, causing some damage but no immediate word of injuries. (AP Photo/Thomas Graning)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Damaged homes and vehicles are seen along Elvis Presley Drive in Tupelo, Miss., Monday, May 3, 2021. A line of severe storms rolled through the state Sunday afternoon and into the nighttime hours. Late Sunday, a “tornado emergency” was declared for Tupelo and surrounding areas. (AP Photo/Thomas Graning)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A Tupelo Water and Light crew works to clear downed trees and power lines along Oakview Drive in Tupelo, Miss., Monday, May 3, 2021. A line of severe storms rolled through the state Sunday afternoon and into the nighttime hours. Late Sunday, a “tornado emergency” was declared for Tupelo and surrounding areas. (AP Photo/Thomas Graning)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Vickie Savell looks at the remains of her new mobile home early Monday, May 3, 2021, in Yazoo County, Miss. Multiple tornadoes were reported across Mississippi on Sunday, causing some damage but no immediate word of injuries. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Economic consultant Laurianne Despeghel and software developer Mario Romero Zavala pose for a portrait at a park in Mexico City's Condesa neighborhood. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by Luis Antonio Rojas hoto by Luis Antonio Rojas for The Washington Post)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Economic consultant Laurianne Despeghel and software developer Mario Romero Zavala pose for a portrait at a park in Mexico City's Condesa neighborhood. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by Luis Antonio Rojas

Published on May 4, 2021

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The figures produced by Mario Romero Zavala, shown, and Laurianne Despeghel were eventually confirmed by government data. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by Luis Antonio Rojas

Published on May 4, 2021

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Laurianne Despeghel worked to develop a system to calculate an estimate of how many people had died during the coronavirus pandemic, giving a new insight into how deadly the virus has been in a Mexico. MUST CREDIT: Photo for The Washington Post by Luis Antonio Rojas

Published on May 4, 2021

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In this March 24, 2021 photo, migrant families, mostly from Central American countries, wade through shallow waters after being delivered by smugglers on small inflatable rafts on U.S. soil in Roma, Texas. The Biden administration said Monday that four families that were separated at the Mexico border during Donald Trump's presidency will be reunited in the United States this week in what Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas calls “just the beginning” of a broader effort. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this March 1, 2021, file photo, Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas speaks during a news conference at the White House in Washington. The Biden administration says four families who were separated at the Mexico border during Donald Trump’s presidency would be reunited in the United States during the first week of May, the first of what Mayorkas calls “just the beginning” of a broader effort. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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In this March 24, 2021 photo, a migrant man, center, holds a child as he looks at a U.S. Customs and Border Protection agent at an intake area after crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, early Wednesday, March 24, 2021, in Roma, Texas. The Biden administration said Monday that four families that were separated at the Mexico border during Donald Trump's presidency will be reunited in the United States this week in what Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas calls “just the beginning” of a broader effort. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Residents go over conceptual plans to widen Arkansas 112 in western Fayetteville with staff from the Arkansas Department of Transportation on Thursday, March 5, 2020, at Church of Christ on West Mount Comfort Road. Construction on the project is expected to begin in 2022.

Published on May 4, 2021

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., leaves a meeting with fellow Republicans on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, April 29, 2021, the day after President Joe Biden addressed Congress on his first 100 days in office. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this April 20, 2021, file photo, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., talks after a GOP policy luncheon, on Capitol Hill in Washington. McConnell says Republicans are willing to spend up to $600 billion for roads, bridges and other projects. That's far less than what President Joe Biden is seeking, but is in line with a new $568 billion proposal put forward by other Senate Republicans. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Nedel Joshi, entomology professor at the University of Arkansas, looks for native bees Monday on a Stern's medlar tree on the Fayetteville campus. There are more than 200 species of bees native to Arkansas. Stern's medlar trees are critically endangered with only around 25 growing in the wild in Prairie County. Visit nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ and nwadg.com/photo. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/J.T. Wampler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A native, ground-nesting bee collects pollen from the blooms of a Stern's medlar tree Monday at the University of Arkansas campus. On warm, sunny days the tree is covered in bees and other pollen-collecting insects. Visit nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ and nwadg.com/photo. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/J.T. Wampler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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President Joe Biden talks to students during a visit to Yorktown Elementary School, Monday, May 3, 2021, in Yorktown, Va., as first lady Jill Biden looks on. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Kay Hodel (from left) and Chris Price admire the necklace of Lori Proud, director of the Springdale Senior Activity and Wellness Center, Monday on the first day of resuming full activities and services at the center in Springdale since the beginning of the pandemic.. Proud described seeing everyone again as "it's like the first day of school." Check out nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ and nwadg.com/photos for a photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/David Gottschalk)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Chris Price (left) and Kay Hodel (right) speak with Lori Proud, director of the Springdale Senior Activity and Wellness Center, Monday on the first day of resuming full activities and services at the center in Springdale since the beginning of the pandemic. Proud described seeing everyone again as "it's like the first day of school." Check out nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ and nwadg.com/photos for a photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/David Gottschalk)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 28, 2019, file photo is a view of Attean Pond near Jackman, Maine. Central Maine Power's controversial hydropower transmission corridor would be in the vicinity of this view from a scenic pullover. A 150-foot-wide swath of land would extend 53 miles from the Canadian border into Maine's north woods. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Heavy machinery is used to cut trees to widen an existing Central Maine Power power line corridor to make way for new utility poles, Monday, April 26, 2021, near Bingham, Maine. As President Joe Biden's administration plans to fight climate change by weaning the nation off fossil fuels, these large-scale renewable energy projects are the source of conflict within a seemingly unlikely group: environmentalists. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Workers for Northern Clearing pound stakes to mark land on an existing Central Maine Power power line corridor that has been recently widened to make way for new utility poles, Monday, April 26, 2021, near Bingham, Maine. As President Joe Biden's administration plans to fight climate change by weaning the nation off fossil fuels, these large-scale renewable energy projects are the source of conflict within a seemingly unlikely group: environmentalists. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 28, 2019, file photo, a homemade sign is posted on a telephone pole in protest of Central Maine Power's controversial hydropower transmission corridor in Jackman, Maine. A $1 billion hydropower electricity transmission corridor called the New England Clean Energy Connect would cut through sparsely populated woodlands. Environmental groups disagree about whether the 145-mile corridor comes at too high a cost in loss of trees and wildlife habitat. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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New metal towers stand on land recently cleared on an existing Central Maine Power power line corridor, Monday, April 26, 2021, near Bingham, Maine. As President Joe Biden's administration plans to fight climate change by weaning the nation off fossil fuels, these large-scale renewable energy projects are the source of conflict within a seemingly unlikely group: environmentalists. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2016, file photo, three wind turbines from the Deepwater Wind project stand off Block Island, R.I. America's environmental and conservation groups have disparate opinions about new renewable energy infrastructure and its trade-offs. While all agree on the need for clean power sources, there are deep disputes about the wisdom of projects that will impose their own impact on the environment. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - This Aug. 13, 2014, file photo, shows an array of mirrors at the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating site in Primm, Nev. Some projects, including the approved $1 billion Gemini solar and battery storage project about 30 miles northeast of Las Vegas, have sparked debate about whether they are simply too big. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - Rows of homes, are shown in suburban Salt Lake City, on April 13, 2019. Utah is one of two Western states known for rugged landscapes and wide-open spaces that are bucking the trend of sluggish U.S. population growth. The boom there and in Idaho are accompanied by healthy economic expansion, but also concern about strain on infrastructure and soaring housing prices. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this June 15, 2016 file photo provided by the Mexican Attorney General's Office, Hector "El Guero" Palma, or “Blondie,” one of the founders of the Sinaloa Cartel, is escorted in handcuffs from a helicopter at a federal hangar in Mexico City, after serving almost a decade in a U.S. prison and transported to another maximum-security lockup to await trial for two murders. (Mexico's Attorney General's Office via AP, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Ryan Wardow, owner of Roadside Services Towing, secures a car to a tow truck, Monday near the train tracks on Walnut Street and South Arkansas Street in Rogers. Rogers Police received a call at 9:29 am on Monday for a single car collision with a train. One person was admitted to the hospital, but his condition is unknown. Check out nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ for today's photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Charlie Kaijo)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Vice President Kamala Harris administers the ceremonial swearing-in of former astronaut and former Florida Sen. Bill Nelson as National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) administrator in the Vice President's Ceremonial Office at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex, Monday, May 3, 2021. With Nelson is his wife Grace Nelson, second from right; son Bill Nelson Jr., left; and daughter Nan Ellen Nelson, second from left. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Vickie Savell, right, looks for her wedding band, as a friend and fellow church member pulls possessions from the remains of her new mobile home early Monday, May 3, 2021, in Yazoo County, Miss. Multiple tornadoes were reported across Mississippi on Sunday, causing some damage but no immediate word of injuries. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Derrick Pounds and his daughter, Madison, 6, clean up debris around their residence on Elvis Presley Drive in Tupelo, Miss., Monday, May 3, 2021. Multiple tornadoes were reported across the state on Sunday. (AP Photo/Thomas Graning)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Robbie Hanner of Bentonville (left) and Jose Hernandez of Bella Vista apply a heat seal vinyl sign Monday to a brick wall of the Experience Fayetteville office on Fayetteville. The men work for Amp Sign and Banner. The sign commemorates the Square to Square Bike Ride between the Fayetteville and Bentonville squares that was held last Saturday. Visit nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ and nwadg.com/photo. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/J.T. Wampler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Hanner lines up the two pieces of the vinyl sign Monday before sealing it to the bricks with a heat gun. Visit nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ and nwadg.com/photo. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/J.T. Wampler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Workers at a mostly empty COVID-19 vaccination clinic located at Cathedral of the Cross A.O.H. Church of God in Birmingham, Ala., are shown on Monday, May 3, 2021. Health officials say vaccine demand is on the decline in some places, and Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey said she will soon end a state health order and state of emergency enacted because of the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Visitors admire the Sistine Chapel inside the Vatican Museums on the occasion of the museum's reopening, in Rome, Monday, May 3, 2021. The Vatican Museums reopened Monday to visitors after a shutdown following COVID-19 containment measures. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Dave Laney, maintenance equipment operator with the Rogers Parks Department, (from left) waits for Jason Kilby to load debris into a vehicle, Monday at Lake Atalanta in Rogers. The Rogers Parks Department has been clearing debris from Lake Atalanta since last week's flooding. Flood water scattered large pieces of tree trunks and rocks along with miscellaneous items like trash and tires along the Lake Atalanta grounds closing the pavilion. The parks department is moving the debris to a side of the parking lot in preparation for FEMA who may provide funding to remove it. The parks department hopes to open the pavilion again by Tuesday. Check out nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ for today's photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Charlie Kaijo)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Dave Laney, maintenance equipment operator with the Rogers Parks Department, (from left) waits for Jason Kilby to load debris into a vehicle, Monday at Lake Atalanta in Rogers. The Rogers Parks Department has been clearing debris from Lake Atalanta since last week's flooding. Flood water scattered large pieces of tree trunks and rocks along with miscellaneous items like trash and tires along the Lake Atalanta grounds closing the pavilion. The parks department is moving the debris to a side of the parking lot in preparation for FEMA who may provide funding to remove it. The parks department hopes to open the pavilion again by Tuesday. Check out nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ for today's photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Charlie Kaijo)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Ben Whitten with the Rogers Parks Department loads debris into a pile, Monday at Lake Atalanta in Rogers. The Rogers Parks Department has been clearing debris from Lake Atalanta since last week's flooding. Flood water scattered large pieces of tree trunks and rocks along with miscellaneous items like trash and tires along the Lake Atalanta grounds closing the pavilion. The parks department is moving the debris to a side of the parking lot in preparation for FEMA who may provide funding to remove it. The parks department hopes to open the pavilion again by Tuesday. Check out nwaonline.com/210504Daily/ for today's photo gallery. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/Charlie Kaijo)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Mark Milley arrives to the chamber ahead of President Joe Biden speaking to a joint session of Congress, Wednesday, April 28, 2021, in the House Chamber at the U.S. Capitol in Washington. (Melina Mara/The Washington Post via AP, Pool)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., waits for the arrival of President Joe Biden, before he addresses a joint session of Congress on April 28. MUST CREDIT: Washington Post photo by Melina Mara.

Published on May 4, 2021

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Afghan nomads lead their donkeys on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Farmers work in a tulip field in Meerdonk, Belgium on Monday, May 3, 2021. Most tulips in the region are grown specifically for the bulbs and not the flowers, however the flowers remain in the fields until fully blossomed before being cut down. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

Published on May 4, 2021

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U.S. Senator Chris Coons, left, looks at Senator Chris Van Hollen during a press briefing in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Monday, May 3, 2021. Top Biden administration officials and U.S. senators crisscrossed the Middle East on Monday, seeking to assuage growing unease among key Gulf Arab partners over America's rapprochement with Iran and other policy shifts. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A member of the wait staff takes food to outdoor diners at the Mediterranean Deli restaurant in Chapel Hill, N.C., Friday, April 16, 2021. Thousands of restaurants and bars decimated by COVID-19 have a better chance at survival as the government begins handing out $28.6 billion in grants _ money to help these businesses stay afloat while they wait for customers to return. The Small Business Administration is accepting applications for grants from the Restaurant Revitalization Fund as of Monday, May 3. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this March 31, 2021 file photo, people drink outdoors on the patio of Big Dean's Ocean Front Cafe, decorated with beer banners with the image of Los Angeles Dodgers's Justin Turner, in Santa Monica, Calif. Thousands of restaurants and bars decimated by COVID-19 have a better chance at survival as the government begins handing out $28.6 billion in grants _ money to help these businesses stay afloat while they wait for customers to return. The Small Business Administration is accepting applications for grants from the Restaurant Revitalization Fund as of Monday, May 3. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Vickie Savell, right, looks for her wedding band, as a friend and fellow church member pulls possessions from the remains of her new mobile home early Monday, May 3, 2021, in Yazoo County, Miss. Multiple tornadoes were reported across Mississippi on Sunday, causing some damage but no immediate word of injuries. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - Chicago White Sox starting pitcher Carlos Rodon (55) celebrates his no hitter against the Cleveland Indians with his teammates in a baseball game in Chicago, in this Wednesday, April, 14, 2021, file photo. The 28-year-old left-hander is a perfect 4-0 with a sparkling 0.72 ERA in four starts, striking out 36 in 25 innings. (AP Photo/David Banks, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Chicago White Sox starter Carlos Rodon delivers a pitch during the first inning of the first baseball game of a doubleheader against the Detroit Tigers, Thursday, April 29, 2021, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty)

Published on May 4, 2021

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The huge container ship "CMA CGM Jacques Saade" of the shipping company CMA CGM sails on the Elbe towards the port in Hamburg, Germany, Monday, May 3, 2021. Large container ships can serve the Port of Hamburg with a draught increased by up to 0.9 metres. After almost two years of construction, shipping can take advantage of the Elbe's new fairway depths. (Marcus Brandt/dpa via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Ebenezer Kwofie

Published on May 4, 2021

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Visitors admire the Sistine Chapel inside the Vatican Museums on the occasion of the museum's reopening, in Rome, Monday, May 3, 2021. The Vatican Museums reopened Monday to visitors after a shutdown following COVID-19 containment measures. (AP Photo/Alessandra Tarantino)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Phoebe Raborn, 18, removes her rollerblades near the Big Dam Bridge after skating on Monday, May 3, 2021. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette/Stephen Swofford)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021, file photo, smoke fills the walkway outside the Senate Chamber as supporters of President Donald Trump are confronted by U.S. Capitol Police officers inside the Capitol in Washington. With riot cases flooding into Washington’s federal court, the Justice Department is under pressure to quickly resolve the least serious cases. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - This March 29, 2018, file photo shows the Facebook logo on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York's Times Square. Former President Donald Trump will find out this week whether he gets to return to Facebook. The social network’s quasi-independent Oversight Board says it will announce its decision Wednesday, May 5 on a case concerning the former president. Trump's account was suspended for inciting violence that led to the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riots. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - President Donald Trump speaks to crowd before boarding Air Force One at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., in this Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021, file photo. Former President Donald Trump will find out this week whether he gets to return to Facebook. The social network’s quasi-independent Oversight Board says it will announce its decision Wednesday, May 5 on a case concerning the former president. Trump's account was suspended for inciting violence that led to the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riots. (AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Jan. 6, 2021 file photo, Trump supporters try to break through a police barrier at the Capitol in Washington. With riot cases flooding into Washington’s federal court, the Justice Department is under pressure to quickly resolve the least serious cases. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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U.S. Senator Chris Coons, left, looks at Senator Chris Van Hollen during a press briefing in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Monday, May 3, 2021. Top Biden administration officials and U.S. senators crisscrossed the Middle East on Monday, seeking to assuage growing unease among key Gulf Arab partners over America's rapprochement with Iran and other policy shifts. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Published on May 4, 2021

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June and Edmond Freeman (Special to The Commercial)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Edmond Freeman (Special to The Commercial)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Edmond Freeman, his wife June and their grandson Isaac, on a trip to Japan in 2000. (Special to The Commercial)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Pine Bluff Commercial columnist Paul Greenberg, left, and Publisher Edmond Freeman share a conversation in this 1970 photo. (Special to The Commercial)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Edmond Freeman is pictured as Pine Bluff Commercial publisher in 1963. (Special to The Commercial)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Edmond Freeman is pictured in a 1953 press identification card issued by The Pine Bluff Commercial. (Special to The Commercial)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Councilmember and Administrative Committee chairman Lloyd Holcomb Jr., (left) discussed the importance of the resolutions requesting budget adjustments for city employees on the agenda. (Pine Bluff Commercial/Eplunus Colvin)

Published on May 4, 2021

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The University of Arkansas-Pine Bluff (UAPB) Golden Lion football team was recognized by Mayor Shirley Washington and the city council during the Pine Bluff City Council meeting Monday night. (Pine Bluff Commercial/Eplunus Colvin)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Philadelphia Phillies starting pitcher Vince Velasquez throws the ball during the first inning of a baseball game against the Milwaukee Brewers, Monday, May 3, 2021, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Derik Hamilton)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Gabby Hess, 3, runs through bubbles in her yard in Owensboro, Ky., Monday, May 3, 2021. (Alan Warren/The Messenger-Inquirer via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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In this photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange, trader Timothy Nick, right, works in his booth on the floor, Monday May 3, 2021. Stocks were solidly higher Monday, and investors cheered a strong dose of positive earnings reports as well as economic data that showed the U.S. economy is growing. (Courtney Crow/New York Stock Exchange via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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In this photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange, specialist Meric Greenbaum, right, works at his post on the floor, Monday May 3, 2021. Stocks were solidly higher Monday, and investors cheered a strong dose of positive earnings reports as well as economic data that showed the U.S. economy is growing. (Courtney Crow/New York Stock Exchange via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Specialist Peter Giacchi, right, calls out prices on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, in this Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020, file photo. Stocks were solidly higher Monday, May 3, 2021, and investors cheered a strong dose of positive earnings reports as well as economic data that showed the U.S. economy is growing. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A native, ground nesting bee collects pollen from the blooms of a Stern’s medlar tree Monday May 3, 2021 at the University of Arkansas campus. On warm, sunny days the tree is covered in bees and other pollen collecting insects. Visit nwaonline.com/210503Daily/ and nwadg.com/photo. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/J.T. Wampler)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this June 2, 2019, file photo, Philippine Secretary of National Defense Delfin Lorenzana speaks during the fifth plenary session of the 18th International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) Shangri-la Dialogue, an annual defense and security forum in Asia, in Singapore. Lorenzana rejected China’s demand that the Philippines end its patrols in the disputed region. (AP Photo/Yong Teck Lim, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2020, file photo, Philippine Secretary of Foreign Affairs Teodoro Locsin Jr. gestures during a senate hearing in Manila, Philippines. The Philippine government has protested the Chinese coast guard's harassment of Philippine coast guard ships patrolling a disputed shoal in the South China Sea, the Department of Foreign Affairs said Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Gov. Tom Wolf gestures at Philadelphia Flyers' mascot, Gritty, during a news conference encouraging people to get the COVID-19 vaccine, in Philadelphia, Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Phil Schiller, an Apple executive, enters the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., on Monday, May 3, 2021, to attend a federal court case brought by Epic Games. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Phil Schiller, an Apple executive, enters the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., on Monday, May 3, 2021, to attend a federal court case brought by Epic Games. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney, second right, approaches the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., to attend his company's federal court case against Apple on Monday, May 3, 2021. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney enters the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., to attend his company's federal court case against Apple on Monday, May 3, 2021. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney enters the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., to attend his company's federal court case against Apple on Monday, May 3, 2021. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A member of Apple's legal team rolls exhibit boxes into the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., as the company faces off in federal court against Epic Games on Monday, May 3, 2021. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Phil Schiller, an Apple executive, enters the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., on Monday, May 3, 2021, to attend a federal court case brought by Epic Games. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Phil Schiller, an Apple executive, enters the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., on Monday, May 3, 2021, to attend a federal court case brought by Epic Games. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney enters the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., to attend his company's federal court case against Apple on Monday, May 3, 2021. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Members of Epic Games' legal team roll exhibit boxes into the Ronald V. Dellums building in Oakland, Calif., for the company's lawsuit against Apple on Monday, May 3, 2021. Epic, maker of the video game Fortnite, charges that Apple has transformed its App Store into an illegal monopoly. (AP Photo/Noah Berger)

Published on May 4, 2021

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U.S. Senator Chris Coons listens to a journalist during a press briefing in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Monday, May 3, 2021. Top Biden administration officials and U.S. senators crisscrossed the Middle East on Monday, seeking to assuage growing unease among key Gulf Arab partners over America's rapprochement with Iran and other policy shifts. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Senator Chris Coons of Delaware talks to the journalists during a press briefing in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Monday, May 3, 2021. Top Biden administration officials and U.S. senators crisscrossed the Middle East on Monday, seeking to assuage growing unease among Gulf Arab partners over America’s rapprochement with Iran and other policy shifts in the region. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Published on May 4, 2021

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U.S. Senator Chris Coons, left, looks at Senator Chris Van Hollen during a press briefing in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Monday, May 3, 2021. Top Biden administration officials and U.S. senators crisscrossed the Middle East on Monday, seeking to assuage growing unease among key Gulf Arab partners over America's rapprochement with Iran and other policy shifts. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE- In this July 2, 2020 file photo, Gary Royster of Atlantic City holds up a wad of cash he used to gamble at the Hard Rock casino in Atlantic City on the day the casino reopened after being shut down for months amid the coronavirus outbreak. On May 3, 2021, Hard Rock officials told The Associated Press they will spend $20 million on renovations, the latest in a line of Atlantic City casinos to reinvest during the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry, FILE)

Published on May 4, 2021

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This July 2, 2020 photo shows a game of craps underway at the Hard Rock casino in Atlantic City N.J. On May 3, 2021, Hard Rock officials told The Associated Press they will spend $20 million on renovations, the latest in a line of Atlantic City casinos to reinvest during the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

Published on May 4, 2021

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This Jan. 16, 2020 photo shows the giant guitar at the entrance to the Hard Rock casino in Atlantic City N.J. On May 3, 2021, Hard Rock officials told The Associated Press they will spend $20 million on renovations, the latest in a line of Atlantic City casinos to reinvest during the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

Published on May 4, 2021

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This April 30, 2021 photo shows the exterior of the Ocean Casino Resort in Atlantic City N.J. Ocean is among numerous Atlantic City casinos reinvesting millions into their operations amid the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Workers at a mostly empty COVID-19 vaccination clinic located at Cathedral of the Cross A.O.H. Church of God in Birmingham, Ala., are shown on Monday, May 3, 2021. Health officials say vaccine demand is on the decline in some places, and Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey said she will soon end a state health order and state of emergency enacted because of the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)

Published on May 4, 2021

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People play with a ball as the sun sets during a clear spring day, in Pamplona, northern Spain, Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Helen Bogdan, 95, gets a Mother's Day makeover from Jennifer Purvis, right, owner of Jennifer's Hair Studio in Peckville, and hair stylist Lisa Ross in her Hanover Township, Pa. home on Monday May 3 2021. Visiting Angels provided the makeover Monday for the homebound resident. (Mark Moran/The Citizens' Voice via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Vice President Kamala Harris administers the ceremonial swearing-in of former astronaut and former Florida Sen. Bill Nelson as National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) administrator in the Vice President's Ceremonial Office at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex, Monday, May 3, 2021. With Nelson is his wife Grace Nelson, second from right; son Bill Nelson Jr., left; and daughter Nan Ellen Nelson, second from left. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A member of the wait staff takes food to outdoor diners at the Mediterranean Deli restaurant in Chapel Hill, N.C., Friday, April 16, 2021. Thousands of restaurants and bars decimated by COVID-19 have a better chance at survival as the government begins handing out $28.6 billion in grants _ money to help these businesses stay afloat while they wait for customers to return. The Small Business Administration is accepting applications for grants from the Restaurant Revitalization Fund as of Monday, May 3. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this June 12, 2012 file photo, the Verizon logo is seen at Verizon store in Mountain View, Calif. Verizon is selling the segment of its business that includes Yahoo and AOL to private equity firm Apollo Global Management in a $5 billion deal. Verizon said Monday, May 3, 2021, that it will keep a 10% stake in the new company, which will be called Yahoo. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - The Yahoo logo is displayed outside of offices in Santa Clara, Calif., in this Monday, April 18, 2011, file photo. Verizon is selling the segment of its business that includes Yahoo and AOL to private equity firm Apollo Global Management in a $5 billion deal. Verizon said Monday, May 3, 2021, that it will keep a 10% stake in the new company, which will be called Yahoo. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - The AOL logo is shown on a wall of the company's New York office, in this Monday, May 12, 2008, file photo. Verizon is selling the segment of its business that includes Yahoo and AOL to private equity firm Apollo Global Management in a $5 billion deal. Verizon said Monday, May 3, 2021, that it will keep a 10% stake in the new company, which will be called Yahoo. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A deer feeds in a field on Monday, May 3, 2021, at Two Rivers Park in Little Rock. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette/Thomas Metthe)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Brad Karren

Published on May 4, 2021

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Derrick Pounds and his daughter, Madison, 6, clean up debris around their residence on Elvis Presley Drive in Tupelo, Miss., Monday, May 3, 2021. Multiple tornadoes were reported across the state on Sunday. (AP Photo/Thomas Graning)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this March 5, 2021, file photo, Texas A&M quarterback Kellen Mond watches the competition at a mini combine organized by House of Athlete in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. The Minnesota Vikings have drafted Mond, with their first of four third-round picks in the NFL football draft. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Jan. 1, 2021, file photo, Notre Dame quarterback Ian Book (12) throws a pass in the first half of the Rose Bowl NCAA college football game against Alabama in Arlington, Texas. Perhaps the best-known collegian selected in the fourth round Saturday was Book. And Book went somewhere with a QB opening: New Orleans, which saw career passing leader Drew Brees retire. (AP Photo/Roger Steinman, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Michael Regan, speaks at Guilford Technical Community College, Monday, April 19, 2021, in Jamestown, N.C., about the Biden administration's American Jobs Plan. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Afghan nomads lead their donkeys on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Rahmat Gul)

Published on May 4, 2021

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President Joe Biden talks to students during a visit to Yorktown Elementary School, Monday, May 3, 2021, in Yorktown, Va., as first lady Jill Biden looks on. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Published on May 4, 2021

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This July 2, 2020 photo shows a game of craps underway at the Hard Rock casino in Atlantic City N.J. On May 3, 2021, Hard Rock officials told The Associated Press they will spend $20 million on renovations, the latest in a line of Atlantic City casinos to reinvest during the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Published on May 4, 2021

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A fishing pier at Regional Park was more of a pier for fish on Monday as high water on the Arkansas River has raised the level of Lake Langhofer, shown here, which is an oxbow of the river. (Pine Bluff Commercial/Byron Tate)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Farmers work in a tulip field in Meerdonk, Belgium on Monday, May 3, 2021. Most tulips in the region are grown specifically for the bulbs and not the flowers, however the flowers remain in the fields until fully blossomed before being cut down. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Visitors enjoy their day on Tiananmen Square during the May Day holidays in Beijing on Monday, May 3, 2021. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Arkansas Travelers assistant groundskeeper Taylor Woelfel rakes the pitcher's mound while getting the field ready for the Travelers' home opener at Dickey-Stephens Park on Monday, May 2, 2021, in North Little Rock. The Travelers will play the Northwest Arkansas Naturals in their first home game since 2019 after last season was canceled due to Covid-19. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette/Thomas Metthe)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Ron Roberts, left, and Ryan McHughes hang a sign outside the new Rock City Taco, a new bar and restaurant opening this week on 3rd st. in downtown Little Rock on Monday, May 3, 2021. (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette/Stephen Swofford)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Female car detailer Maryam Roohani polishes a car as her trainee Farahnaz Deravi watches, at a detailing shop in Tehran, Iran, April 18, 2021. The auto industry remains male-dominated around the world, let alone in the tradition-bound Islamic Republic. Still Iranian women, especially in the cities, have made inroads over the years. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Female trainee Farahnaz Deravi watches a man repair a car door at a detailing shop in Tehran, Iran, Sunday, April 18, 2021. The auto industry remains male-dominated around the world, let alone in the tradition-bound Islamic Republic. Still Iranian women, especially in the cities, have made inroads over the years. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Iranian car detailer Maryam Roohani, right, and her brother Reza polish a car at a detailing shop in Tehran, Iran, April 18, 2021. Maryam Roohani has battled skeptics and stereotypes to live out her dream of working as a professional detailer. The auto industry remains male-dominated around the world, let alone in the tradition-bound Islamic Republic. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Female Iranian car detailer Maryam Roohani polishes a car at a detailing shop in Tehran, Iran, April 18, 2021. Roohani has battled skeptics and stereotypes to live out her dream of working as a professional detailer. The auto industry remains male-dominated around the world, let alone in the tradition-bound Islamic Republic. Still Iranian women, especially in the cities, have made inroads over the years. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Female Iranian car detailer Maryam Roohani, left, cleans a car spraying water as her trainees watch, at a detailing shop in Tehran, Iran, Sunday, April 18, 2021. Roohani has battled skeptics and stereotypes to live out her dream of working as a professional detailer. The auto industry remains male-dominated around the world, let alone in the tradition-bound Islamic Republic. Still Iranian women, especially in the cities, have made inroads over the years. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Iranian car detailer Maryam Roohani polishes a car at a detailing shop in Tehran, Iran, April 18, 2021. Roohani has battled skeptics and stereotypes to live out her dream of working as a professional detailer. The auto industry remains male-dominated around the world, let alone in the tradition-bound Islamic Republic. Still Iranian women, especially in the cities, have made inroads over the years. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto poses for a portrait inside her home where she lives alone and waits her turn to get a COVID-19 vaccine in Burzaco, Argentina, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021. Corleto, who says she has carried out strict isolation to avoid getting COVID-19 and sees it more as a goal than a burden, got her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine on April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto adjusts her mask as she peers out the window of her home where she lives alone and waits her turn to get a COVID-19 vaccine in Burzaco, Argentina, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021. Corleto, who said she never imagined the lockdown would last so long, or that COVID-19 would be so contagious and dangerous, got her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine on April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto poses for a portrait at her home where she lives alone and waits her turn to get a COVID-19 vaccine in Burzaco, Argentina, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021. Corleto, who said the first thing she wants to do after getting vaccinated is go to the bakery and supermarket to pick out her own food, got her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine on April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto shows her rosary as she explains that she misses going to church and now prays the rosary at home, where she lives alone awaiting her turn to get a COVID-19 vaccine in Burzaco, Argentina, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021. Corleto, who got her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine on April 23, 2021, said the vaccine is the endpoint for her, describing it as a light at the end of a path that will enable her to return. "I love life, I want to live," she said. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto poses for a portrait amid her clothing that hangs to dry at home where she lives alone and waits her turn to get a COVID-19 vaccine in Burzaco, Argentina, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021. Corelto, who said she didn't leave her house for seven months straight except to walk around the block after the lockdown started in March 2020, got her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine on April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto drinks mate outside her home where she lives alone and waits for her turn for the COVID-19 vaccine in Burzaco, Argentina, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021. Corleto, who said that the vaccine is like the light at the end of the tunnel in Ernesto Sabato's book titled “The tunnel,” got her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine on April 23, 2021, (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto watches a soap opera on her computer at home where she lives alone and awaits her turn for a COVID-19 vaccine in Burzaco, Argentina, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021. Corleto, who said she set up a daily routine for herself during the ongoing lockdown, consisting of reading, dancing, sudoku and watching soap operas, got her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine on April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto smiles for the camera at her home where she lives alone and waits her turn for the COVID-19 vaccine in Burzaco, Argentina, Thursday, Feb. 18, 2021. Corleto, who said she took the virus seriously when it arrived in Argentina and that she was worried and scared, prompting her to respect the lockdown and leave her home as little as possible, got her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine on April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko).

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto, right, waits with others for her turn for a first dose of the AstraZeneca vaccine for COVID-19 at a vaccination center in Almirante Brown, Argentina, Friday, April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto smiles after getting her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine for COVID-19 at a vaccination center in Almirante Brown, Argentina, Friday, April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto gets her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine for COVID-19 at a vaccination center in Almirante Brown, Argentina, Friday, April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto's vaccination certificate sits on a table after a nurse administered her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine for COVID-19 at a vaccination center in Almirante Brown, Argentina, Friday, April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto sits during an observation period after getting her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine for COVID-19 at a vaccination center in Almirante Brown, Argentina, Friday, April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Carmela Corleto arrives home from a vaccination center where she got her first shot of the AstraZeneca vaccine for COVID-19 in Burzaco, Argentina, Friday, April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Galloping Goose Historical Society members Chris Pranskatis, Ben Deason, Joe Becker and Bill Wolf, from left, work April 16, 2021, to remove a door from a stock car that was built in 1903 to transport livestock, as they ready the vehicle for display in Dolores, Colo. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing the car and four other types of narrow-gauge railcars to put on display in Dolores. (Jerry McBridge/The Durango Herald via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Galloping Goose Historical Society member Chris Pranskatis helps to removed the door from a stock car that was built in 1903 to transport livestock, Friday, April 16, 2021, in Dolores, Colo. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing the car and four other types of narrow-gauge railcars to put on display in Dolores. (Jerry mcBridge/The Durango Herald via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bill Wolf, with the Galloping Goose Historical Society, describes how wooden panels could slide down for air circulation on one of the boxcars that the society is fixing up for display in this photograph taken Friday, April 16, 2021, in Dolores, Colo. The historical society is in the process of stabilizing five cars that ran on local narrow-gauge tracks. (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners approach the mine entrance in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. During Ramadan, observant Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset and Zenica coal miners are no exception. For the entire duration of the Muslim holy month, they go about their normal work routine, insisting they feel no exceptional hunger, thirst or exhaustion. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners wait outside their mine before their shift in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. During Ramadan, observant Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset and Zenica coal miners are no exception. For the entire duration of the Muslim holy month, they go about their normal work routine, insisting they feel no exceptional hunger, thirst or exhaustion. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners hold a briefing before their shift start at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. Arriving for their shift and assembling for a roll call before riding an elevator into the mine tunnels, they carry with them transparent plastic bags containing simple meals brought from home with which they will break their daily fast 500 meters (1,640 feet) below the surface. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A Bosnian coal miner changes into his work outfit at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. During Ramadan, observant Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset and Zenica coal miners are no exception. For the entire duration of the Muslim holy month, they go about their normal work routine, insisting they feel no exceptional hunger, thirst or exhaustion. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners wait for an elevator to take them underground at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. Bosnia's coal mines, including the one in Zenica, have been badly maintained, and have seen almost no investment and modernization as the region was engulfed in an ethnic conflict in the 1990s. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners hold bags of food as they stand in an elevator taking them underground at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. During Ramadan, observant Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset and Zenica coal miners are no exception. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners walk in an underground tunnel at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. During Ramadan, observant Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset and Zenica coal miners are no exception. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A Bosnian coal miner checks equipment in an underground tunnel at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. During Ramadan, observant Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset and Zenica coal miners are no exception. For the entire duration of the Muslim holy month, they go about their normal work routine, insisting they feel no exceptional hunger, thirst or exhaustion.(AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners work in an underground tunnel at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. Arriving for their shift and assembling for a roll call before riding an elevator into the mine tunnels, they carry with them transparent plastic bags containing simple meals brought from home with which they will break their daily fast 500 meters (1,640 feet) below the surface.(AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners work in an underground tunnel at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. Arriving for their shift and assembling for a roll call before riding an elevator into the mine tunnels, they carry with them transparent plastic bags containing simple meals brought from home with which they will break their daily fast 500 meters (1,640 feet) below the surface. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners break fast in the underground at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. Inside mine shafts, one can't see sunset, but miners consult their watches and smartphones for the right time to sit down, unwrap their food and break their daily fast together. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A Bosnian coal miner breaks fast in the underground at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. Inside mine shafts, one can't see sunset, but miners consult their watches and smartphones for the right time to sit down, unwrap their food and break their daily fast together. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners pray after breaking fast in the underground at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. Inside mine shafts, one can't see sunset, but miners consult their watches and smartphones for the right time to sit down, unwrap their food and break their daily fast together. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners pray after breaking fast in the underground at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. After a quick meal, one of the miners issues a call to prayer and the men break into groups of two or three before returning to their difficult and dangerous job.(AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners pray after breaking fast in the underground at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. After a quick meal, one of the miners issues a call to prayer and the men break into groups of two or three before returning to their difficult and dangerous job.(AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners pray after breaking fast in the underground at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. After a quick meal, one of the miners issues a call to prayer and the men break into groups of two or three before returning to their difficult and dangerous job.(AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners work in an underground tunnel at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. During Ramadan, observant Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset and Zenica coal miners are no exception. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners restart their shift after in an underground tunnel at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. During Ramadan, observant Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset and Zenica coal miners are no exception. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Bosnian coal miners walk in an underground tunnel at a mine in Zenica, Bosnia, Thursday, April 29, 2021. During Ramadan, observant Muslims abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset and Zenica coal miners are no exception. (AP Photo/Kemal Softic)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Jim Bohon a music instructor with Bridge Kaldro Music got his sign back and is having fun, poking fun, at the store's retail neighborhood in Christiansburg, Va., Thursday, April 22, 2021. It was Bridge Kaldro Music that that touched off this battle royale, challenging businesses to poke silly fun at one another. It has quickly spread across town and gone viral online. (Matt Gentry/The Roanoke Times via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Intermediate drummer student Sean Vogt, left, practices with his music instructor Jim Bohon of Bridge Kaldro Music in Christiansburg, Va., Thursday, April 22, 2021. It was Bridge Kaldro Music that that touched off a battle royale with signs, challenging businesses to poke silly fun at one another. It has quickly spread across town and gone viral online. (Matt Gentry/The Roanoke Times via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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The sign war started with Bridge Kaldro Music and their neighbor Super Shoes, left, in Christiansburg, Va., Thursday, April 22, 2021. It was Bridge Kaldro Music that that touched off this battle royale, challenging businesses to poke silly fun at one another. It has quickly spread across town and gone viral online. (Matt Gentry/The Roanoke Times via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Kabuki Japanese steakhouse and sushi jumped into the retail neighborhood sign war in Christiansburg, Va., Thursday, April 22, 2021. It was Bridge Kaldro Music that that touched off this sign battle royale, challenging businesses to poke silly fun at one another. It has quickly spread across town and gone viral online. (Matt Gentry/The Roanoke Times via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Burger King takes a sign war shot with their digital display sign in Christiansburg, Va., Thursday, April 22, 2021. It was Bridge Kaldro Music that that touched off this sign battle royale, challenging businesses to poke silly fun at one another. It has quickly spread across town and gone viral online. (Matt Gentry/The Roanoke Times via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Teacher Larry Johnston opens the boxes containing the pieces students will weld together for their entry to the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. After being canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Central Virginia Welding Wars regional competition is back this year, but it looks a little bit different. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Johnathan Graham welds his piece for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. After being canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Central Virginia Welding Wars regional competition is back this year, but it looks a little bit different. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Elijah Grishaw walks into the welding area to work on his piece for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Landon Coffey welds his entry for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. After being canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Central Virginia Welding Wars regional competition is back this year, but it looks a little bit different. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Senior Elijah Grishaw welds his piece for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. After being canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Central Virginia Welding Wars regional competition is back this year, but it looks a little bit different. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Johnathan Graham works on his piece for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. After being canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Central Virginia Welding Wars regional competition is back this year, but it looks a little bit different. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Johnathan Graham talks with classmate Elijah Grishaw while preparing to start work on their pieces for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Landon Coffey, left, and Elijah Grishaw work on their pieces for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A welding work area used by a student to make their submission to the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Teacher Larry Johnston walks through the welding area as his students work on their entries for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Boxes containing the pieces students will weld together for their entry to the Central Virginia Welding Wars sit unopened on a table in the classroom at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Senior Bolden Daniels works on his entry for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. After being canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Central Virginia Welding Wars regional competition is back this year, but it looks a little bit different. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Completed pieces the students will submit for the Central Virginia Welding Wars at Amherst County High School in Amherst, Va. on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. After being canceled last year because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Central Virginia Welding Wars regional competition is back this year, but it looks a little bit different. (Kendall Warner/The News & Advance via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Joanne and Edward Dauer pose at the Dauer Museum of Classic Cars in Sunrise, Fla., on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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A 1934 Ford Gasoline Tanker Truck is on display at Dauer Museum of Classic Cars in Sunrise on Wednesday, April 21, 2021. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Edward Dauer walks past antique cars at the Dauer Museum of Classic Cars in Sunrise, Fla., on Wednesday April 21, 2021. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Antique cars are on display at Dauer Museum of Classic Cars in Sunrise, Fla., on Wednesday April 21, 2021. (Carline Jean/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this July 28, 2014, file photo, lightning strikes over Lake Mead near Hoover Dam that impounds Colorado River water at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area in Arizona. Water officials in Arizona say they are prepared to lose about one-fifth of the water the state gets from the Colorado River in what could be the first mandated cut. The federal government recently projected the first-ever shortage of river water that supplies millions of people in the U.S. West and Mexico. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Oct. 14, 2015, file photo, a riverboat glides through Lake Mead on the Colorado River at Hoover Dam near Boulder City, Nev. Water officials in Arizona say they are prepared to lose about one-fifth of the water the state gets from the Colorado River in what could be the first mandated cut. The federal government recently projected the first-ever shortage of river water that supplies millions of people in the U.S. West and Mexico. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Aug. 13, 2020, file photo, a bathtub ring of light minerals delineates the high water mark on Lake Mead at the Lake Mead National Recreation Area near Boulder City, Nev. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation projected earlier this month that Lake Mead, which delivers water to Arizona, will fall below 1,075 feet (328 meters) for the first time in June 2021. If the lake remains below that level in August when the bureau issues its official projection for 2022, Arizona and Nevada will lose water. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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FILE - In this Oct. 8, 2019, file photo, the Central Arizona Project canal runs through rural desert near Phoenix. Water officials in Arizona say they are prepared to lose about one-fifth of the water the state gets from the Colorado River in what could be the first federally declared shortage in the river that supplies millions of people in the U.S. West and Mexico. The voluntary and mandatory Tier 1 cuts mean Arizona will lose 18% of its Colorado River supply, or 512,000 acre-feet of water. The amount represents 30% of the water that goes to the Central Arizona Project, which manages the canal system and had made excess water available for farmers. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)

Published on May 4, 2021

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Chase Morman rushes over to catch dollar bills from his daughter Bo, 20 months, on April 28, 2020, as she sits on the shoulders of her mother Kirsten in front of the City Supply store at the downtown square in Fayetteville. The city has formed a steering committee to guide economic recovery from the covid-19 pandemic. (NWA Democrat-Gazette/David Gottschalk)

Published on May 4, 2021