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New government in N. Ireland blocked over Brex trade rules

by JILL LAWLESS THE ASSOCIATED PRESS | May 14, 2022 at 4:17 a.m.
Democratic Unionist Party leader Jeffrey Donaldson pauses as he speaks to the media Monday at Parliament Buildings, Stormont, Belfast. (AP/Peter Morrison)

LONDON -- Northern Ireland's second-biggest political party on Friday blocked the formation of a working legislature in Belfast, and said it would keep up the boycott until the U.K. government tears up post-Brexit trade rules it accuses of destabilizing the region.

The Democratic Unionist Party's move deepens Northern Ireland's political deadlock, which is fueling a U.K.-EU feud that could cause a trade war between Britain and the 27-nation European Union.

The Democratic Unionist Party came second in a Northern Ireland Assembly election last week that saw Irish nationalist party Sinn Fein win the most seats -- the first time a party that seeks union with the Republic of Ireland has won an election in the bastion of Protestant power.

Under Northern Ireland's mandatory power-sharing rules, that gives Sinn Fein the post of first minister, with the Democratic Unionist Party taking the deputy first minister job. A government can't be formed unless both roles are filled, and the Democratic Unionist Party says it won't take part unless border checks on goods moving to Northern Ireland from the rest of the U.K. are scrapped.

It stymied attempts to elect a speaker for the assembly when they met for the first time Friday, leaving the assembly unable to function.

"The [Democratic Unionist Party] received a mandate to remove the Irish Sea border and our mandate will be given respect," assembly member Paul Givan told legislators. "Our message is now clear: It is time for action. Words will no longer suffice."

Democratic Unionist Party leader Jeffrey Donaldson said the party's concerns over the new trade rules, known as the Northern Ireland Protocol, "are not merely some political squabble."

"The protocol is a direct challenge to the principles that have underpinned every agreement reached in Northern Ireland over the last 25 years" of Northern Ireland's peace process, he said. "It erodes the very foundations that devolution has been built upon."

Sinn Fein leader Michelle O'Neill accused the Democratic Unionist Party of "disgracefully holding the public to ransom for their Brexit mess."

Naomi Long, leader of the centrist Alliance Party, the third largest in the assembly, said it was "a shameful day for the [Democratic Unionist Party]."

"We want to serve the public but are prevented from doing so," she said.

Arrangements for Northern Ireland -- the only part of the U.K. that shares a land border with an EU nation -- have been a subject of contention in the U.K.'s divorce from the bloc, which became final at the end of 2020.

A deal was agreed to keep the Irish border free of customs posts and other checks, because an open border is a key pillar of the peace process that ended decades of violence in Northern Ireland. Instead, there are checks on some goods, such as meat and eggs, entering Northern Ireland from the rest of the U.K.

The arrangement is opposed by the Democratic Unionist Party and other unionists in Northern Ireland, who say the new checks have created a barrier with the rest of the U.K. that is hurting businesses and undermines unionists' British identity.

Sinn Fein and the other nationalist and nonaligned parties, which collectively got a majority of votes in the election, want to keep the Protocol.

Print Headline: New government in N. Ireland blocked over Brex trade rules

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