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HEALTH CARE NOTEBOOK: Parkinson's focus of a virtual forum | Program created to treat addiction

by Kat Stromquist | April 4, 2021 at 8:23 a.m.

Parkinson's focus of a virtual forum

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences is hosting a virtual forum to discuss Parkinson's disease.

The free program begins at 1 p.m April 11, according to the UAMS website. It's an annual event for people with Parkinson's disease, caregivers, family members and clinicians.

The medical condition is a progressive nervous-system disorder that can cause tremors, stiffness, problems with speech and other issues with movement, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Participants in the forum will learn more about the latest research and therapies for the disease. Other discussions include digital health offerings, intimacy and cognitive rehabilitation and stimulation.

The event will be hosted on the Zoom videoconferencing platform and will include a question-and-answer session with experts.

Registration is free and online at neurosurgery.uams.edu/about/events/ps2021.

Program created to treat addiction

CHI St. Vincent partnered with Bradford Health Services to create a treatment program for addiction issues, the health system's officials said in a news release.

The program offers a "continuum of care" that includes inpatient services for 30 people based at CHI St. Vincent Infirmary in Little Rock.

The site also has 10 detoxification spaces, and outpatient care will be offered. The program will work with patients with alcohol, drug, food or other substance addictions, according to an announcement.

"In the past, we have too often thought of addiction in the wrong way. Now we know it is no different from diabetes or COPD," Bradford Health Services Chief Executive Mike Rickman said in a statement announcing the program.

"There is no quick and easy solution. It is a health issue that requires ongoing maintenance and care."

Bradford Health Services programs incorporate the 12-step recovery model used by groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous, according to the organization's website.

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