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story.lead_photo.caption A Hertz Car Rental is closed during he coronavirus pandemic on Wednesday, May 6, 2020 in Paramus, N.J. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey)

Hertz filed for bankruptcy protection Friday, unable to withstand the coronavirus pandemic that has crippled global travel and with it, the indebted 102-year-old car rental company's business.

The Estero, Fla.-based company's lenders were unwilling to grant it another extension on its auto lease debt payments past a Friday deadline, triggering the filing in U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Delaware.

Hertz and its subsidiaries will continue to operate, according to a release from the company. Hertz's principal international operating regions and franchised locations are not included in the filing, the statement said.

By the end of March, Hertz Global Holdings Inc. had racked up $18.7 billion in debt with only $1 billion of available cash.

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Starting in mid-March, the company -- whose car-rental bands also include Dollar and Thrifty -- lost all revenue when travel shut down due to the novel coronavirus, and it started missing payments in April. Hertz has also been plagued by management upheaval, naming its fourth CEO in six years on May 18.

"No business is built for zero revenue," former CEO Kathryn Marinello said on the company's first quarter earnings conference call May 12. "There's only so long that companies' reserves will carry them."

In late March, Hertz shed 12,000 workers and put another 4,000 on furlough, cut vehicle acquisitions by 90% and stopped all nonessential spending. The company said the moves would save $2.5 billion per year.

But the cuts came too late to save Hertz, the nation's No. 2 auto rental company founded in 1918 by Walter L. Jacobs, who started in Chicago with a fleet of a dozen Ford Model T's. Jacobs sold the company, initially called Rent-A-Car Inc., to John D. Hertz in 1923.

Under a Chapter 11 restructuring, creditors will have to settle for less than full repayment, but the company is likely to continue operating.

Hertz isn't the first struggling company to be pushed into bankruptcy by the coronavirus crisis. The company joins department store chain J.C. Penney, as well as Neiman Marcus, J.Crew and Stage Stores.

A Section on 05/23/2020

Print Headline: Hertz files for bankruptcy as outbreak, debt take toll

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