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story.lead_photo.caption The Rev. Robert W. Lee IV (right), a descendant of Robert E. Lee, talks with Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax last week in Richmond before a news conference on Gov. Ralph Northam’s plans to re- move a statue of the Confederate general. More photos at arkan- sasonline.com/68richmond/. (AP/Steve Helber)

RICHMOND, Va. -- David Harris Jr., a nephew of tennis legend and humanitarian Arthur Ashe, tried for decades to get a street named for his uncle in Richmond, the hometown that once denied Ashe access to segregated public tennis courts.

Finally, in 2019, the City Council approved the renaming over the objections of some residents. So it was gratifying, Harris said, to see Virginia's governor announce plans to remove an iconic statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee after days of protests over the death of George Floyd.

"My hat is off to them for getting this done," Harris said Friday. "It took me 25 years to get the street name changed. I commend these young folks for getting these guys to see it within a week and a half."

In recent days, amid an extraordinary outpouring of grief over Floyd's death, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam has pledged to remove the Lee statue, while city leaders have also committed to taking down the other four Confederate memorials along Richmond's prestigious Monument Avenue.

The changes amount to a reshaping of how one of America's most historic cities tells its story in its public spaces -- and a rethinking of whom it glorifies.

"It's been a long time coming. ... We've tried marches, petitions, protests, going to city council" to get the Confederate monuments removed, said Phil Wilayto, a longtime community organizer and activist with Virginia Defenders for Freedom, Justice & Equality. "And it took what is in effect a mass uprising of the community to say these things are not acceptable."

Republican lawmakers, Confederate heritage groups and a Monument Avenue preservation group have criticized the decisions. Some have warned they could hurt tourism, and many have equated the monuments' removal to erasing history.

"Attempts to eradicate instead of contextualizing history invariably fail," Senate GOP leaders said in a statement.

Gallery: Richmond, Va., Confederate monuments

[Gallery not loading above? Click here for more photos » arkansasonline.com/68richmond/]

Late Saturday, a small group of demonstrators toppled a statue of Confederate Gen. Williams Carter Wickham in Monroe Park, a Richmond police spokeswoman said. She said she did not know if there were any arrests.

Meanwhile, in southwest England, protesters toppled the statue of a prominent slave trader. Footage from local broadcaster ITV News West Country showed demonstrators attached ropes to the statue of Edward Colston before pulling it down in the city of Bristol.

Colston, born in 1636, was prominently involved in Britain's sole official slaving company at the time, the Royal African Company, which transported tens of thousands of Africans across the Atlantic Ocean, mainly to the Caribbean.

The Richmond monument decisions, part of a wave of Confederate monument removals around the country, have stunned some observers in this former capital of the Confederacy, a place where even three years ago many residents said they considered removing the statues impractical, or nearly impossible due to a state law that protected war memorials.

The new Democratic majority at the General Assembly rewrote that law earlier this year, an effort led by black women lawmakers. It will take effect July 1, giving Richmond and other localities around the state permission to do as they please. The Lee statue, meanwhile, was on state property.

"Yes, that statue has been there for a long time," Northam said Thursday. "But it was wrong then, and it is wrong now. So we're taking it down."

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The Moon illuminates the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue Friday June. 5, 2020, in Richmond, Va. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam has ordered the removal of the statue. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
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EDS NOTE: OBSCENITY - Rev. Robert W. Lee, IV, left, the fourth great nephew of Confederate General Robert E. Lee, speaks to protesters at the foot of the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue Thursday, June 4, 2020, in Richmond, Va. Lee supports the removal of the statue, which Gov. Ralph Northam said will be removed “as soon as possible” from Monument Avenue. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
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EDS NOTE: OBSCENITY - Rev. Robert W. Lee, IV, center, the fourth great nephew of Confederate General Robert E. Lee., speaks to protesters at the foot of the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue, Thursday Jun. 4, 2020, in Richmond, Va. Lee supports the removal of the statue that has been ordered by Va. Gov. Ralph Northam. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam gestures as he announces his plans to remove the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue during a news conference Thursday, June 4, 2020, in Richmond, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
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FILE - This Tuesday, June 2, 2020 file photo shows a large group of protesters gather around the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue near downtown in Richmond, Va. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced plans Thursday, June 4, for the removal of the iconic statue. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
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EDS NOTE: OBSCENITY - Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, left, speaks to protesters in front of the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue Thursday, June 4, 2020, in Richmond, Va. Fairfax supports the removal of the statue, which Gov. Ralph Northam said will be removed “as soon as possible” from Monument Avenue. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
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FILE - This Tuesday, June 2, 2020 file photo shows a large group of protesters gather around the statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee on Monument Avenue near downtown in Richmond, Va. Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam announced plans Thursday, June 4, for the removal of the iconic statue. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

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