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story.lead_photo.caption A member of the press, left, films riot police officers during a protest, Saturday, Dec.12, 2020 in Paris. Protests are planned in France against a proposed bill that could make it more difficult for witnesses to film police officers. (AP Photo/Lewis Joly)

Paris police arrest

142 demonstrators

PARIS -- Paris police took 142 people into custody at what quickly became a tense and sometimes ill-tempered protest Saturday against proposed security laws, with officers wading into the crowd of several thousand to haul away suspected troublemakers.

Police targeted protesters they suspected might coalesce into violent groups like those who vandalized stores and vehicles and attacked officers at previous demonstrations.

The interior minister said police detained 142 people. Long lines of riot officers and police vehicles escorted the march through rain-slickened streets. They hemmed in protesters, seeking to prevent any flare-up of violence. A water cannon doused demonstrators as night fell.

Marchers were protesting a proposed security law that has sparked successive weekends of demonstrations and a draft law aimed at combating Islamist radicalism.

The security bill's most contested measure could make it more difficult to film police officers. The provision caused such an uproar that the government has decided to rewrite it.

Hong Kong denies

bail for key activist

HONG KONG -- Jimmy Lai, the 73-year-old Hong Kong media tycoon and advocate for democracy, was denied bail Saturday after being charged the previous day under the Chinese territory's new national security law.

Lai faces a charge of collusion with foreign elements to endanger national security, apparently for tweets he made and interviews or commentaries with foreign media.

The Apple Daily, a pro-democracy tabloid owned by Lai, said he is accused of asking a foreign country, organization or individual to impose sanctions or engage in other hostile activities against Hong Kong or China. His case was adjourned to April at the request of prosecutors.

Lai, who was already being held on other fraud charges after police raided his media company, could be seen handcuffed to a chain around his waist as guards led him to a van to go from prison to court.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo tweeted Saturday that the security law "makes a mockery of justice." He called for Lai's release, saying his only crime is speaking the truth about China's authoritarian Communist Party government.

Russia missile test

a display of force

MOSCOW -- A Russian nuclear submarine Saturday successfully test-fired four intercontinental ballistic missiles in a show of readiness of Moscow's nuclear forces amid tension with the U.S.

The Defense Ministry said the Vladimir Monomakh submarine of the Pacific Fleet launched four Bulava missiles in quick succession from an underwater position in the Sea of Okhotsk. Their dummy warheads hit their targets on the Chiza shooting range in the Arkhangelsk region in northwestern Russia more than 3,400 miles away, the ministry said.

The Vladimir Monomakh is one of the new Borei-class nuclear submarines that carry 16 Bulava missiles each and are intended to serve as the core of the naval component of the nation's nuclear forces for decades to come.

As part of the large-scale drills of Russia's strategic nuclear forces that began Wednesday, another Russian nuclear submarine also performed a practice launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile from the Barents Sea, a ground-based ICBM was launched from the Plesetsk facility in northwestern Russia, and Tu-160 and Tu-95 strategic bombers fired cruise missiles at test targets at an Arctic range.

-- Compiled by Democrat-Gazette staff from wire reports

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A man walks toward a police water canon during a protest against a proposed security bill, Saturday, Dec.12, 2020 in Paris. The bill's most contested measure could make it more difficult for people to film police officers. It aims to outlaw the publication of images with intent to cause harm to police. The provision has caused such an uproar that the government has decided to rewrite it. Critics fear the law could erode press freedom and make it more difficult to expose police brutality. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
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A demonstrators lights up a flare during a protest against a proposed security bill, Saturday, Dec.12, 2020 in Paris. The bill's most contested measure could make it more difficult for people to film police officers. It aims to outlaw the publication of images with intent to cause harm to police. The provision has caused such an uproar that the government has decided to rewrite it. Critics fear the law could erode press freedom and make it more difficult to expose police brutality. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
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A riot police officer pushes a couple during a protest, Saturday, Dec.12, 2020 in Paris. Protests are planned in France against a proposed bill that could make it more difficult for witnesses to film police officers. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
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Riot police officers charge a man holding his phone during a protest, Saturday, Dec.12, 2020 in Paris. Protests are planned in France against a proposed bill that could make it more difficult for witnesses to film police officers. (AP Photo/Lewis Joly)
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Riot police officers take position during a protest against a proposed bill, in Lyon, central France, Saturday, Dec. 12, 2020. The bill's most contested measure could make it more difficult for people to film police officers. It aims to outlaw the publication of images with intent to cause harm to police. The provision has caused such an uproar that the government has decided to rewrite it. Critics fear the law could erode press freedom and make it more difficult to expose police brutality. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
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A protester holds a poster reading "Global repression, Total regression"" during a protest, Saturday, Dec.12, 2020 in Paris. Protests are planned in France against a proposed bill that could make it more difficult for witnesses to film police officers. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
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Riot police officers scuffle with demonstrators during a protest, Saturday, Dec.12, 2020 in Paris. Protests are planned in France against a proposed bill that could make it more difficult for witnesses to film police officers. (AP Photo/Lewis Joly)
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A riot police officer uses a spray gains demonstrators during a protest, Saturday, Dec.12, 2020 in Paris. Protests are planned in France against a proposed bill that could make it more difficult for witnesses to film police officers. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
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A police vehicle drives on the Place de la Republique after a protest against a proposed security bill, Saturday, Dec.12, 2020 in Paris. The bill's most contested measure could make it more difficult for people to film police officers. It aims to outlaw the publication of images with intent to cause harm to police. The provision has caused such an uproar that the government has decided to rewrite it. Critics fear the law could erode press freedom and make it more difficult to expose police brutality. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

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