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• Carrying boxes of fruit, Richard Gere visited rescued migrants Friday on a humanitarian ship that has been stuck in the Mediterranean Sea for over a week, landing smack in the middle of a debate over immigration. The American film star took food and supplies by boat to 121 people aboard the Open Arms, a rescue ship floating in international waters near the Italian island of Lampedusa after being blocked from entering ports in Italy and Malta. Those nations want fellow European Union countries to take in more of the migrants who come across the sea. The actor, 69, spoke to several migrants who had fled war-torn Libya on unseaworthy smuggling boats before being rescued. Gere has a long history of human-rights activism. He happened to be in Italy this week and after seeing news about the boat's plight, contacted the Spanish charity Open Arms and asked "How can I help?" a spokesman for the group said. Two days later Gere was on Lampedusa, helping load a boat with supplies. "The most important thing for these people here is to be able to get to a free port, to get off the boat, to get on land and start a new life," Gere said.

• Entertainer Wayne Newton is being sued by a Las Vegas woman who claims the veteran crooner's pet monkey bit and injured her daughter during an invited visit to Newton's showpiece mansion nearly two years ago. Jocelyne Urena filed a civil negligence suit in Nevada court in Las Vegas this week seeking damages on behalf of her daughter, Genevieve. Genevieve, then 15, received emergency hospital treatment for a bite to her right wrist from a capuchin monkey named Boo, her mother's attorney, Marc Naron, said Thursday. The lawsuit alleges the monkey attacked the girl without provocation during a tour of the 77-year-old Newton's gilded former estate, Casa de Shenandoah. Naron said the animal was not caged or on a leash and was being shown to tour guests. The lavish 40-acre property southeast of the Las Vegas Strip was home to "Mr. Las Vegas" and his family for more than 40 years. Newton's wife, Kathleen McCrone Newton, said in an email that a family business entity broke ties with Casa de Shenandoah in July 2017, three months before the lawsuit alleges the girl was injured. "We are not a party and have no idea what happened in October 2017," she said.

Photo by AP
Richard Gere
Photo by FR156391 AP
Wayne Newton

A Section on 08/10/2019

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