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story.lead_photo.caption Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie is shown in this photo.

• Republican Chris Christie left the New Jersey governor's office Tuesday with his popularity in tatters, but at least he didn't break a leg. Christie is the first elected New Jersey governor in more than two decades to not suffer a broken leg while in office. In 2007, Democrat Jon Corzeine broke his leg during a vehicle accident on the Garden State Parkway in 2007. He also suffered broken bones in his chest and back, and spent more than a week in critical condition. Another Democrat, Jim McGreevey, fractured his left femur during a walk on the beach in Cape May in 2002. And, Republican Christine Todd Whitman fractured her right leg while skiing in Switzerland in 1999. Former Obama administration Justice Department official Eric Columbus dug up the nugget on Twitter after Christie was replaced by Democratic Gov. Phil Murphy. He noted that the Democrats broke their left legs, while the Republican Whitman broke her right leg. The state's last elected governor to leave office without breaking a leg was Democrat Jim Florio, who left office in 1994. But Christie's lieutenant governor was not as lucky. Kim Guadagno broke her elbow and wrist while riding a bike in October 2014, when she was serving as acting governor because Christie was out of the state.

• British Prime Minister Theresa May tried to paper over the cracks in the U.K.'s "special relationship" with the U.S., after President Donald Trump scrapped a planned visit to London. Trump's decision not to attend next month's formal opening of the new U.S. Embassy building has left May's team members scratching their heads -- with some speculating that he might be annoyed at reports that he won't be invited to Prince Harry's coming wedding to the actress Meghan Markle. Also, May advised Queen Elizabeth to invite Trump on a "state visit" -- the highest honor the U.K. can give a foreign leader -- but he has so far not set a date. Amid warnings that any such visit will spark street protests, British officials think it's possible that the president may never make the trip across the Atlantic. "We have a special and enduring relationship with the United States," May told lawmakers in the House of Commons on Wednesday. "I'm not responsible for invitations to the royal wedding." May's relationship with Trump has been troubled since his election, with arguments over anti-terror measures, intelligence leaks and a very public clash over the president's re-tweeting of a far-right anti-Muslim activist.

Photo by AP/Matt Dunham
British Prime Minister Theresa May walks away to leave after speaking at the launch of her 25-year environment plan at the London Wetland Centre in south west London, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2018.

A Section on 01/18/2018

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