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story.lead_photo.caption In this Sept. 19, 2017, file photo, Les Moonves, chairman and CEO of CBS Corporation, poses at the premiere of the new television series "Star Trek: Discovery" in Los Angeles.

• A 59-page report prepared by lawyers for CBS outlines more allegations of sexual misconduct by longtime chief Les Moonves. The new report accuses Moonves of destroying evidence and misleading investigators as he attempted to protect his reputation and severance payments. It also said investigators had received "multiple reports" about a network employee who was "on call" to perform oral sex on Moonves."A number of employees were aware of this and believed that the woman was protected from discipline or termination as a result of it," The New York Times cited the report as saying. "Moonves admitted to receiving oral sex from the woman, his subordinate, in his office, but described it as consensual." The report said the woman did not respond to the investigators' requests for an interview. The report was prepared by lawyers the network hired to determine whether Moonves violated the terms of his employment agreement. CBS declined to comment Wednesday and lawyers for Moonves did not immediately respond. The report, to be presented to CBS's board of directors before the company's annual meeting next week, could form the basis for Moonves being denied the $120 million severance package he was given after he had to quit in September amid numerous allegations of sexual misbehavior.

• A typographical error in a tweet written by one of President Donald Trump's lawyers has linked to an anti-Trump prank. Rudy Giuliani wrote Tuesday that the social network had "allowed someone to invade my text with a disgusting anti-President message." But Giuliani, the former New York mayor, had inadvertently created a hyperlink when he failed to put a space after a period in a Nov. 30 tweet that read: "Mueller filed an indictment just as the President left for G-20.In July he indicted the Russians who will never come here just before he left for Helsinki.Either could have been done earlier or later. Out of control!Supervision please?" G-20.In is a real domain name, but it hadn't been used before Giuliani tweeted it. Twitter automatically converts such valid links into blue, clickable text. Web firm designer Jason Velazquez told The New York Times that when he saw the link, he paid $5 to buy the domain and created a page in about 15 minutes. Those who clicked on the link see: "Donald J. Trump is a traitor to our country." A Twitter spokesman says the company can't edit users' tweets and "the accusation that we're artificially injecting something into a tweet is completely false."

Photo by The New York Times/DOUG MILLS
Rudy Giuliani, President Donald Trump's attorney, uses a smartphone during an event outside the White House in Washington, May 30, 2018. After Giuliani accidentally tweeted a hyperlink - and a prankster took advantage of it - the president's lawyer baselessly accused Twitter of letting someone "invade my text."

A Section on 12/06/2018

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