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Prayer, love needed

to make schools safe

Gun control is not the answer. If students could hear their teachers pray for their safety, hear their teacher call their name out to God, hear their teacher asking God to help them know and care about each other, hear their teacher pray that they can resist bullying and to help them understand why it might be that they would feel the need to do that, hear their teacher asking God to help them understand what would be taught that day, hear their teacher praying for them to succeed -- it just might decrease, if not end, the mass school shootings.

Are the phrases "under God" and "In God we trust" just empty words? Prayer changes things-- for the better. The day it became against the law to allow it in school was truly a killer.

Student marches are also not the answer. It seems to me that will widen the distance between those students who feel secure/empowered and those who do not -- making those who do not more likely to strike out in unacceptable ways.

If the secure/empowered ones would, in real love, reach out -- not down -- to the students who are struggling with their self-worth it could be a giant step in stopping gun violence in school.

Let's try prayer and love.

The situation our nation is facing reminds me of a question I once heard: "If your house was flooded because you forgot to turn off a faucet, and you had a bucket, broom and mop, what would you do first?" Of course, the obvious answer is to first turn off the faucet. Our nation needs to get to the heart of the problem instead of pushing gun control and promoting marches.

Karen Smith

Fayetteville

Dalliances of leaders

not limited to today

As of late, the media have had much to say about the sexual proclivities of Donald trump. In fairness to his highness, it is only right that his errant ways be viewed in perspective to other political leaders. Banal, hormonal urges are not uncommon among our political hierarchy. Lest we forget, Benjamin Franklin was known as a real babe magnet and fathered an illegitimate child his wife helped raise. Alexander Hamilton was being blackmailed for having an affair with Maria Reynolds. Thomas Jefferson found out about it and began spreading the rumor and all the while he was fathering children with his slave, Sally Heming.

Andrew Jackson took a bride that was still married to another. Grover Cleveland was suspected of having a mistress and fathering a son out of wedlock. He also hosted his White House wedding to a 21-year-old college coed who was 49 years his junior. Warren Harding fathered a child out of wedlock and had an affair with his best friend's wife, Carrie Phillips. It was rumored that he had still another affair and that they had sex in a White House closet while Secret Service agents stood guard at the door. Not ashamedly, he even boasted that "it was a good thing that he wasn't a woman because he would be pregnant all of the time."

FDR, sans Eleanor, took his female aide with him everywhere he went. And Ike's driver-lady was always close by. Gary Hart dropped out of the presidential race after photos showed him cavorting about with damsels other than his wife. John Edwards similarly withdrew from the campaign when he admitted to fathering a bastard, while his wife was dying of cancer. John Kennedy probably had more than one tryst while he sat in the Oval Office and was especially recognized for his services by Marilyn Monroe when she serenaded "Happy birthday, Mr. President." Even Jimmy Carter admitted to the sin of lust in a Playboy Magazine interview. And of course, there was Bill Clinton's ever-wondering eye.

Have I missed someone? Probably so. Now here comes Donald Trump. Recalling the campaign exchanges where he and Sen. Marco Rubio compared their sexual prowess; where video interviews exposed (excuse me) his star-power abilities to do with women as he would; and the bevy of sex-related lawsuits in-waiting, one could justifiably conclude that he has a problem, an issue, a need, a want, whatever. But is that really different from the many politicos that have preceded him?

Jack Fuller

Rogers

Commentary on 04/16/2018

Print Headline: NWA Letters to the Editor

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