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A sicker system

Health-care bill will cost seniors

Subscriber onlyIf you were to ask a typical Arkansan how to fix health care in America, you can be sure he or she would not suggest that Washington allow insurance companies to price people out of affordable coverage. Continue reading...

Letters

Subscriber onlyPlan doesn't help us Continue reading...

If bar allows guns, staying out is a choice

Subscriber onlyIf bar allows guns, staying out is a choice Continue reading...

The price of effective policing

Subscriber onlyWatching the debate in this country over public safety, you'd think some people wish to live securely while others welcome Armageddon. Conservative pundit Bill O'Reilly recently went after "liberal politicians" in Chicago and San Francisco, noting crime in those cities and saying, "The situation is out of control and a disgrace, and that's what happens when incompetent politicians demand the police stop enforcing laws." Continue reading...

R. E. Lee, unperson

Subscriber onlyBehold: How good it is for brothers to dwell together in unity! But there's a catch--that little word unity. The Arkansas House recently approved a bill, by a vote of 66-11, to divide those of us who venerate the memory of Martin Luther King Jr. from those of us who still worship at the shrine of Robert E. Lee. Continue reading...

Decades-old satire mirrors modern times

Subscriber onlyThe Trump administration has made the sales of old novels great again. Americans who fear the rise of demagogic autocracy are seeking dystopian books to learn more about the dangers Trump poses or to convince themselves that our present Armageddon has been prophesied. George Orwell's 1984, Sinclair Lewis' It Can't Happen Here and Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale have been among the top-selling books on the Washington Post's paperback fiction list for weeks. George F. Will recommends a more recent dystopian novel, Lionel Shriver's The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047. As the Post's nonfiction critic Carlos Lozada put it, "A president who rarely cracks books has unwittingly launched a book club for America." Continue reading...

Does the U.S. overpay for health care?

Subscriber only"America spends more on health care than other rich nations but has lower life expectancy." Continue reading...

Clarification

Subscriber onlyIn a guest column concerning Senate Bill 373 (which would add a temporary exemption to the Freedom of Information Act for attorney-client communications and attorney work product records related to threatened or pending litigation against a public agency) that appeared March 19 in Perspective, author JoAnn C. Maxey, General Counsel, University of Arkansas System, noted that the authors of the sixth edition of The Arkansas Freedom of Information Act write that entities subject to the FOIA face a "severe disadvantage in litigation." The correct quote from p. 465 of the book is that a lawyer representing a public agency "is at a significant disadvantage in litigation." Continue reading...

Jimmy Breslin's art of describing Washington

Subscriber onlyJimmy Breslin will always be remembered as a New York newspaperman. But he also made an indelible contribution to documenting the Watergate scandal and in doing so, breathed life into some of Capitol Hill's most influential characters. Continue reading...

Leave the Constitution alone

Subscriber onlyOur new political environment continually prompts the question: Is nothing sacred? Continue reading...

Best-sellers

Subscriber only1. DANGEROUS GAMES by Danielle Steel. A television correspondent investigates damning allegations against the vice president of the United States. Continue reading...

'Now more than ever' needs to go

Subscriber onlyIn June 1972, Republican pollster Robert M. Teeter commissioned two focus groups of ticket-splitting middle-income 35-and-older Detroit voters without college degrees to test campaign slogans for Richard M. Nixon. Nixon's team wondered if one of the slogans under consideration was too sophisticated, but Teeter disagreed. In a memo to White House Chief of staff H.R. Haldemann, he explained that "the slogan had a certain emotional appeal which the other slogans did not possess," and it looked good on a bumper sticker. So it became official: President Nixon. Now more than ever. Continue reading...

The sorry state of American poverty

Subscriber onlyA year and a half ago, renowned travel writer Paul Theroux wrote an opinion piece for the New York Times--based on his then-new book Deep South: Four Seasons on Back Roads--that raised a lot of hackles. Some objected to Theroux's views on manufacturing jobs and globalization, which we would now call Trumpian. Then there was this assertion: Continue reading...

Gorsuch and the primacy of common sense

Subscriber onlyI'm an originalist and a textualist, not a nut. Continue reading...

In search of perfection

Icy obsession

Subscriber onlySome may search for diamonds while others hunt for gold. Gary Garrison's life quest today seeks frozen treasures in plastic molds. Continue reading...