Who was Joe George?

Remember him—and Pearl Harbor

Subscriber onlyHe was a boatswain's mate second class assigned to a repair ship in the U.S. Navy that fateful Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941. He knew how to obey orders and when to ignore them. The American military may one day use robots in action, but they'll always have to have human minders. Just for this sort of thing. Continue reading...

It's still O.J.'s world

Subscriber onlyFor nearly a quarter-century, O.J. Simpson has served as a referendum on some American flashpoint: race, class, domestic violence, justice, California, celebrity. Continue reading...

Implant saga

Back in the chair

Subscriber onlyI'm fully reclined in the leather chair again, staring into the light above as Dr. Derrick Johnson, the nationally regarded specialist in implanting lost teeth, prepares to continue the rebuilding process. Continue reading...

Irrelevancy in D.C.

Subscriber onlyToday brings Chapter 3 in the recently unfolding narrative we might call Profiles in Irrelevance. Continue reading...

Letters

Subscriber onlyReform needs repair Continue reading...

Lowell Grisham: Who would Jesus insure?

Stories of Bible offer insights into health care

Subscriber onlyWhat do we owe one another in society? How do we structure our laws to promote freedom and justice for all? When Jesus was asked that question, he had a ready answer: "Love your neighbor as yourself." Continue reading...

NWA LETTERS

Subscriber onlyRemembering Roger’s Rec Hall the way it was Continue reading...

Letters to the Editor

Subscriber onlyRemembering Roger's Continue reading...

Little Charlie

Subscriber onlyOne cannot imagine a more wrenching moral dilemma than the case of little Charlie Gard. He is a beautiful 11-month-old boy with an incurable genetic disease. It depletes his cells' energy-producing structures (the mitochondria), thereby progressively ravaging his organs. He cannot hear, he cannot see, he can barely open his eyes. He cannot swallow, he cannot move, he cannot breathe on his own. He suffers from severe epilepsy and his brain is seriously damaged. Doctors aren't even sure whether he can feel pain. Continue reading...

The clear choice

Wood design ideal in the South

Subscriber onlyAs a supporter of green building design, I am also an advocate for wood construction. Wood is imbued with some amazing physical properties; it's natural, it's renewable and, as a design element, it's aesthetically captivating. Continue reading...

More of the best

Subscriber onlyI wrote a column about a year ago filled with lists of the "best" of this or that, as in the best NFL running backs, the best World War II novels and so on. Continue reading...

Letters

Subscriber onlyPull back on the reins Continue reading...

NWA LETTERS

Subscriber onlyChristian voters guided by values, not parties Continue reading...

A crisis you’ve never heard of

Subscriber onlyMore than 20 million people in four countries are at risk of starvation in the coming months, in what the United Nations has called the worst humanitarian crisis since World War II. But the global response to the emergency has been lacking, both from governments and from private citizens. The U.N. reports that only 43 percent of the $6.27 billion needed to head off famine this year in Yemen, Somalia, South Sudan and Nigeria had been raised. Continue reading...

Uh, can we slow this one down?

Subscriber onlyLast week, lawmakers in Arkansas heard a pitch from a company promoting a new product to help control the feral pig population in this state. And for anybody who spends time outdoors in Arkansas—hunting, hiking, biking, camping—you know the state has a problem. Continue reading...

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