Monuments to idiocy

TSA’s policies blamed for lengthy waits, angry passengers

Subscriber onlyNaming anything after a living politician is usually a bad idea; but this summer we can make an exception. Now that Americans spend much of their vacations waiting in security lines at airports, we should honor the public servants responsible. Continue reading...

Education and its discontents

Subscriber onlyOnce upon a time a liberal education was just that--an education that liberated man from ignorance and made him fit to govern himself as a citizen. Continue reading...

The decline of angry white males

Subscriber onlyYou can argue about when the contemporary era of white male reaction in American politics began. But surely March 8, 1970, four days after National Guardsmen opened fire on students at Kent State University, deserves a hearing. Continue reading...

Terrorists' names, faces should be published

Subscriber onlyMajor media outlets in France have recently decided not to publish the names and faces of terrorists so as not to glorify them and encourage copycats. On the surface this might seem like reasonable self-imposed discretion in the interests of national security. But it's actually self-censorship, and it's dangerous. It reflects a subtly mistaken conception of why jihadis are prepared to die for their cause, and it risks dehumanizing an enemy that is dangerous precisely because its adherents are humans with identifiable motives. Continue reading...

Stem cell salvation: not yet

Subscriber onlyVisitors to the website of StemGenex, a La Jolla medical group, could be forgiven for thinking that the answer to their prayers is finally at hand. Pitched at sufferers of lung disease, Parkinson's, autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis and even Alzheimer's, the site offers treatments based on injecting patients with stem cells drawn from their own body fat. Continue reading...

Living past 100 isn't for everybody

Subscriber onlyChildren and teenagers in the world's developed countries have a more than 50 percent chance of living past 100. By the early 2100s, "being a centenarian will no longer be a rarity. In fact, it will be the norm." Continue reading...

Phasing out private prisons wise decision

Subscriber onlyThe Justice Department plans to phase out its use of private prisons after a report concluded that they are significantly inferior to government-run prisons. That's a definite step forward, but America has much further to go if we hope to fix our deeply flawed criminal justice system. Continue reading...

Why we should help suffering Syrians

Subscriber onlyRecently our beloved family dog, Katie, died at the age of 12. She was a gentle giant who respectfully deferred even to any mite-size puppy with a prior claim to a bone. Katie might have won the Nobel Peace Prize if not for her weakness for squirrels. Continue reading...

Best-sellers

Subscriber only1. THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD by Colson Whitehead. A slave girl heads toward freedom on the network, envisioned as actual tracks and tunnels. Continue reading...

Not all hate groups are KKK

Subscriber onlyThis year marks the 150th anniversary of the Ku Klux Klan's founding. At its height the KKK boasted an estimated 5 million members and dominated politics across the South. Many Klan members openly engaged in domestic terrorism and made bombings, lynchings and flaming crosses a fact of life for decades. Continue reading...

Awful disclosures and American decency

Subscriber onlyIn January 1836, a book called The Awful Disclosures of Maria Monk: the Hidden Secrets of a Nun's Life in a Convent Exposed was published by a New York publishing house under the imprint of Howe and Bates. Continue reading...

The adventure begins

A dig for diamonds

Subscriber onlyI figured if Bobbie Oskarson of Colorado could happen across an 8.5-carat diamond in plain sight during her June visit to the Crater of Diamonds State Park in Murfreesboro, why couldn't I? Hey, I'm as capable as anyone of root-hoggin' in the dirt and spotting a sparkly stone. Continue reading...

The 'performance' drug

Subscriber onlyArkansas has been tinkering for a few years with a nationwide higher-education concept to send more money to colleges that retain and graduate more students and less money to those that retain and graduate fewer students. Continue reading...

Letters

Subscriber onlyTapped into fear, hate Continue reading...

Brenda Blagg: Students told no

UA movement for vote center may not be over

Subscriber onlyThe University of Arkansas won't get an early voting center -- at least not now. Continue reading...

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