Posted: March 7, 2018 at 2:53 a.m.

Guarded on economy

Amid the chaos in the White House, the one thing that the president's supporters have hung their hat on is the economy. Which is what anyone would expect with the repeal of regulations and a huge tax gift to corporations. These immediate economic gains may not endure for the average American because what is potentially looming is inflation. Inflation would not be bad for the federal government because the national debt could be paid off with a cheaper dollar.

Taxes are normally cut to stimulate the economy. This latest huge corporate tax cut comes when unemployment is in the 4 percent range, which historically is almost full employment. Keep in mind income is still stagnant.

In addition to stimulating the economy with tax cuts, the president wants to impose tariffs which should increase prices on many goods.

Another campaign promise Trump made was a huge program to rebuild America's infrastructure. This will also take billions of borrowed dollars.

Huge deficit spending and tariffs appear to be perfect ingredients for inflation. Inflation in turn will rob struggling Americans of any benefits being accrued, especially older citizens. Couple inflation with very real potential for environmental or economic disasters from deregulation, and we face a very unsure economic future.

In the end we need to be very grateful for our good economy but based on current fed policy, we also need to be guarded for inflation.



Mission has changed

I have been a hunter and gun owner for 60 years, and am over 80 years old. During this time, only shotguns with three shots or less could be used to hunt waterfowl, and the gun bore size was dictated. The U.S. worked with Canada to establish this law to protect the diminishing waterfowl population. In 1991, lead shot for shotguns was banned on federal lands and in waterfowl hunting areas because lead was causing health problems in waterfowl and other aquatic animals.

I have hunted deer, antelope and elk with rifles. Seldom were over three shots ever fired because the animal was either dead or gone (most of the time the latter). The only sporting guns available at that time with multiple-shot capacity were the Daisy BB gun or .22-caliber rifle, neither fully automatic or of great killing power.

The National Rifle Association (NRA) was established in 1871 by hunters, shooters and other gun enthusiasts to promote marksmanship and gun safety. The NRA reports that presently there are over 5 million members. The focus of the NRA appears to have changed in the 1970s from being gun enthusiasts and responsible gun owners to political lobbyists who campaign against control of ammunition or firearms. The NRA provides financial support to governmental candidates, therefore, the government will not properly control firearms.

In the 20th century, data indicates the government legislated to protect waterfowl. However, in the 21st century (and because of lobbying by the NRA) the government apparently will not legislate to protect humans--in particular, our children. Enough is enough ... do something!



Eliminate atrocities

Newborn twins dumped like trash, babies beaten and killed, little children tortured, abused and killed. The question must be asked: Would not it been better had these babies been aborted than have to suffer so horrifically in their short lives?

Why do people cry out and advocate more for the unborn than for these poor little souls? Why aren't there calls for mandatory sex education and mandatory parenting classes in schools, mandatory birth control for people whose children have been taken from them and for those who don't financially support their children, mandatory sterilization for anyone who has killed or abused a child? Why aren't methods of birth control easily obtainable? There would be little need for abortions if the real problem of unwanted pregnancies didn't exist.

So instead of attempting to limit abortions, the attorney general, the Legislature and the governor could become advocates for the actual born and eliminate the atrocities imposed upon too many babies and children.



Classes would aid kids

I believe that it would be very beneficial for schools to teach emotional intelligence to kids starting at young ages, and going all the way through high school. There are several benefits of teaching emotional intelligence classes in schools.

These classes would help kids learn to cope with their problems and not take them out on others. In today's society, kids are exposed to a lot of bad things starting at young ages. With social media on the rise and it becoming more and more popular for kids to own smartphones, kids have gained easier access to the news and all of the bad things that go on in today's society. In teaching emotional intelligence classes, teachers could help students realize that there are better ways for dealing with anger than violence. This would potentially lessen crime rates in the future.

Emotional intelligence classes would also give students a break from learning from books while still learning useful knowledge. These classes could be taught informally and allow students to "get away" from the school environment for a little bit. Students could not only learn how to cope with their anger, but also learn how to safely handle violence around them.

These emotional intelligence classes would act as a safe haven for students. Students would be able to comfortably talk about their issues and have help on how to deal with it.



Awareness of racism

Is racism one of the most arguable topics in the U.S.? People are judging others by skin color, which makes others not comfortable with their appearance and skin. This is why we must raise awareness about racism and the effect it's having on children.

Racism affects the whole population, whether directly or indirectly, but what most people don't often think about is how it affects the children of today. Parents might argue that their children are too young to understand politics or racial issues. But most children actively notice and think about it, developing an awareness of racial stereotypes early. It can be damaging.

For both adults' and children's sakes, try to invite people into your life who don't look like you, don't think like you, don't act like you, and don't come from where you come from, and you might find that they will challenge your assumptions and make you grow as a person. You might get powerful new insights from these individuals.

This is vital so that the next generation really understands that this progress will help them, because they're expecting parents or adults to be great role models. Showing more love and courage and respect to all races will show children how to treat others with love, with courage.


Little Rock

Editorial on 03/07/2018