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Report: Avoidable error killed 5 GIs, Afghan in airstrike

Posted: September 5, 2014 at 2:51 a.m.

The first page of the report released by U.S. Central Command Thursday, Sept. 4, 2014, on the friendly fire incident in Afghanistan in June is photographed in Washington on Sept. 4, 2014. Avoidable miscommunication between U.S. air and ground forces led to a incident that killed five U.S. soldiers and one Afghan.

A "friendly fire" instance in Afghanistan that killed five U.S. soldiers and one Afghan in June was caused by a series of avoidable miscommunications among air and ground forces, according to a military investigation report released Thursday.

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