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Technology Could Impede Childhood Brain Development

Posted: March 24, 2014 at 5 a.m.

STAFF PHOTO ANTHONY REYES Kim Westphal, kindergarten teacher at Bayyari Elementary School, helps students in the computer lab Wednesday at the school in Springdale.

Children and adolescents use technology more than ever, and some scientists believe time spent with a screen could impede brain development.

AT A GLANCE

Effects Of Too Much Screen Time

• The more television a child watches, the more he is at risk of becoming overweight.

• The more television a child watches, the more likely it is that he will have trouble falling asleep.

• Children in elementary school who spend more than two hours a day watching television or using a computer are more likely to have emotional, social and attention problems.

• Children in elementary school who have televisions in their bedrooms receive lower scores on tests than those who don't.

• Children who spend a lot of time on a computer or watching television have less time to exercise and play.

Source: mayoclinic.org

BY THE NUMBERS

Children, Teenagers And Media

Note: Media in this case refers to TV, cellphones, iPads and social media.

8 hours — The average amount of time each day children ages 8 to 10 spend on various media

More than 11 hours — The amount of time each day older children and teenagers spend on various media

71 percent — Children and teenagers who have televisions in their bedrooms

84 percent — Children and teenagers who have Internet access

75 percent — Children ages 12 to 17 who have cellphones

Two-thirds — Children and teenagers who have no rules at home about time they are allowed to spend with media

More than 60 percent — Teenagers who send or receive text messages after they go to bed

Source: Official Journal Of The American Academy Of Pediatrics

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