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School District Eyes Grant

Money Could Boost Classroom Technology

Posted: November 5, 2012 at 5 a.m.

A laptop for every student, more counselors, coordinators responsible for fostering parent partnerships, more after-school programs and teacher training are all part of the vision cast for the Rogers School District in an application to the national Race to the Top grant.

By The Numbers

Grant

The grant is divided over four years and all Rogers schools, including two scheduled to open in 2013, Janie Darr Elementary School and New Technology High School. Programs would benefit all students, administrators said.

Project costs over four years:

10,000 computers — $10 million

800 charge carts — $1.7 million

500 interactive white boards — $1 million

Internet service/software/wiring — $705,000

Reading/math materials or software — $1.44 million

Consultants to train teachers — $800,000

Supplies for New Technology High School — $1.5 million

Family night materials — $24,000

Multi-station gym packages — $1.2 million

After-school teachers (hourly) — $375,000

Partnerships with nonprofit agencies — $320,000

Office supplies — $12,000

Source: Race to the Top application

Personnel grant would add:

Two computer techs

Substitute teachers

Four reading/math coaches for teachers

Two career counselors

Two social workers

Four middle school counselors

Two certified teachers for night school

Two data coaches

Grant administrator and assistant

Instructional parent coordinator/facilitators

Source: Race to the Top application

Web Watch

Grant Application

To see the Rogers School District’s application for a Race to the Top grant go to www.nwaonline.com/documents.

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Ah, wonderful technology and counselors! But will there ever be money directed to ensuring that students are able to write a well-reasoned, grammatically correct and coherent essay, or be instilled with ideas of self-reliance, self-initiative, and work ethics? The lack of these skills in the work force is one of the biggest challenges employers face today.

Posted by: RDodger

November 5, 2012 at 8:44 p.m. ( | suggest removal )

RE "But will there ever be money directed to ensuring that students are able to write a well-reasoned, grammatically correct and coherent essay..."
Some money is already directed to this end. However, as long as Teabaggers who know no better than to complain about the cost of educating children are able to influence the financial support of education, it won't be enough. This skill-- like most valuable skills-- is hard to teach, and hard to evaluate; it costs money that quite a few people don't want schools to have.

RE "...or be instilled with ideas of self-reliance, self-initiative, and work ethics?"
That is primarily the job of the parents. Schools would have a better chance of reinforcing these traits if parents hadn't divested the public schools of the authority over students that should be concurrent with responsibility for them.

Posted by: AlphaCat

November 5, 2012 at 10:42 p.m. ( | suggest removal )