(Advertisement)

Fayetteville Keeps Mail Processing Operation

Fort Smith, Harrison work moving to city

Posted: February 24, 2012 at 5:56 a.m.

Andrew Davis, right, and Laura Curtis, processing clerks for the U.S. Postal Service, sort parcels on Dec. 22 at the facility in south Fayetteville.

The U.S. Postal Service announced Thursday it will keep Fayetteville’s mail processing center open and merge some postal operations from Harrison into it. The move will expand the number of postal jobs at the Fayetteville center, which the service in December targeted to close and consolidate with a Little Rock facility.

At a Glance

U.S. Postal Service

• Delivers to more than 150 million addresses each day.

• Lost $3.3 billion last quarter.

• Studied 264 processing facilities for possible consolidation. Six facilities are on hold for further internal study, 35 will remain open and 223 will be consolidated — all or in part.

• Network consolidation would reduce operating costs by $2.6 billion annually and result in a net savings of $2.1 billion.

• Consolidation is part of an across-the-board plan to reduce costs by $20 million by 2015.

• Projects cutting 30,000 full-time and 5,000 part-time positions.

Source: U.S. Postal Service

Web Watch

Studies, Updates

A list of mail processing studies and their status and specific information abut individual sites is available at usps.com/ourfuturenetwork.

This story is only available from our archives.

(Advertisement)



« Previous Story

Residents Give Opinions On Road’s Future

David Short, from left, president of Arvest Bank Benton County, and wife Deb Short look at a map of North Walton Boulevard on Thursday as Mayor Bob McCaslin talks with Don Carroll, owner of Batter Up in Bentonville, during a workshop.

More than 100 residents turned out to give their opinions on the future of North Walton Boulevard at a public ... Read »

Next Story »

Trejo acquitted of rape

A Washington County jury has found a North Carolina man not guilty of raping a 12-year-old girl. The jury of five women and seven men deliberated for about an hour Friday... Read »